Train2Game news: Job interview advice from Crytek UK

Train2Game students often apply for jobs in the industry. So, for those fortunate enough to get interviewed for a full-time position in game development, here’s some excellent advice on echnique from Nottingham based Crytek UK, developers of Crysis 2 and the upcoming Homefront 2.

“Research the company you are applying for, know what business they are in, what games they make and what makes them good at doing this.” Crytek Lead Programmer Richard Semmons told Develop in their April recruitment spotlight, adding that potential employers are impressed if you know the company.

“We’re always impressed by people that have taken the time to understand why they want to get a job with us rather than just because it was a mail shot to every company out there.”

If getting interviewed for a job, Semmons suggests having questions to ask the staff conducting the interview is also helpful.

“Prepare questions. You will most likely be sat in front of leads or directors within the industry, these guys will have a wealth of experience and if nothing else comes of your interview, ask questions to further your development or understanding of the jobs you are going for.”

He added that if the developer has a free engine that’s out there to use, then you should definitely use it, in another example of how modding is great for aspiring game developers.

“The CryEngine Free SDK is out there for people to experiment with. You have a chance to demonstrate your interest in the engine, an insight into how we work and how we utilise our technology; take it!”

Develop’s recruiter hot seat is sure to make interesting reading for Train2Game students looking for a job in the industry; you can read it in full here.

There’s more helpful advice from industry professionals on how to give yourself the best chance of getting that all important first job here on The Train2Game Blog.

What are your thoughts on the advice from Crytek? What interview advice would you give?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game news: Games industry might not be ready for cloud gaming say Crytek

Train2Game students will get the opportunity to try out cloud gaming for themselves at the Eurogamer Expo next week and form their own opinions of the service.

But according to Crysis developers Crytek however, games industry isn’t quite ready for cloud gaming, even if the service does have potential.

“It’s maybe that the concept has come before we were ready for it as an industry,”Crytek Director of Global Business Carl Jones told GamesIndustry.biz

“We’re just trying to throw things at it right now and I’m not sure if that’s going to make people money. And whether or not the consumer needs it.”

Jones suggested that cloud gaming providers  OnLive and Gaikai have great potential, but argues that there’s one major problem holding cloud gaming back: the cost of running the service.

“You talk to anyone whose been in the online gaming business for the last five years and they’ll tell you that server costs have not gone down,” he said.

“Because if you just take Crysis or Crysis 2, run it on the cloud, every extra gamer you add in needs a lot more processing power and that costs a lot of money.”

However, as previously reported by the Train2Game blog, Gaikai founder Dave Perry believes that the service has everything it needs to become successful.

Nonetheless, Jones is excited about the prospect of cloud gaming and suggests that games will be designed specifically for the service in the future. Could it therefore be something Train2Game students develop games for in future?

“I think what’s going to happen now is that we’re going to start seeing people designing games for the cloud, designing technology for the cloud and making the best use of it.” Concluded the Crytek Director.

Train2Game blog readers may remember that last week THQ claimed the future of the industry involves cloud gaming in big way, in that future consoles won’t use discs.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on cloud gaming? Is it too early for the service to be successful? Is it indeed the future of the industry? Would you develop games specifically for it?

Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

[Source: GI.biz]