Train2Game news: 40% of freemium players make in-game purchases

Train2Game students are likely to be familiar with the rise of free-to-play titles, and new research suggests 40% of players will spend money on purchasing content. The majority of players who make payments will do so in their first month.

The report from NPD Group also suggests 84% of those who play trial versions of free-to-play titles will move on to play the full games.

“The majority of freemium gamers who opt to pay to upgrade their experience do so within the first month of playing a particular game,” said Anita Frazier, industry analyst for The NPD Group. “When designing a game, it’s important to consider features that would drive quick conversion to pay.”

“Males and those ages 18 to 34 are traditionally seen as a big part of the core gamer audience, so it’s likely these groups are not quite as engaged with freemium because the gaming experience is quite different from what they are used to from the games they play on consoles, handhelds or PC’s,” continued Frazier.

“At a minimum, for these gamers a freemium game would provide a different experience, like a snack versus a full meal.” she concluded.

Earlier this year, Brawl Busters developer Rock Hippo told The Train2Game Blog that free-to-play allows them to reach a much larger audience.

Various browser based and PC games use a free-to-play model, while formerly subscription based MMOs including Lord of the Rings Online, Dungeons and Dragons Online, Star Trek Online and, as reported by The Train2Game Blog, even Everquest are among those which have switched to a free-to-play model, each with a varying degree of success.

For the latest news on free-to-play in game development, keep reading The Train2Game Blog.

What are your thoughts on the percentage of free-to-play players making in-game purchases? Is it a model you’d consider using?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

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