Train2Game News Interview with Fee Stewart on Women in Games

Fiona StewartFormerdroid Managing Director and former Train2Game student Fee Stewart has made a list of the top 100 women in gaming. We interviewed her about what the nomination meant to her and what it’s like being female in the UK Games Industry.

What does it mean to be included in the list of Top 100 Women In Games?

Personally I am chuffed to be amongst such great women in the industry. It feels great that there is so many women in the industry to be able to narrow it down to 100. I would now like to see the top 100 males too though now! It’s all about inclusion and diversity at the end of the day.

When going about your work, do you see yourself as one of the UK’s high flying women in Gaming?

Definitely not lol. I think I will always feel humble when looking at what others do. I love this industry with an extreme passion so have never felt that I am “Working” when doing what I love. I still feel I haven’t actually achieved anything worthy yet.

How important do you think this kind of event is to females in the Games Industry?

It’s nice to be included. It is nice to see that there are other girls in the industry and if it encourages more girls to join it then it is worth doing but at the end of the day it is equally important that everyone, male and female are made to feel inclusive into the industry.

What are some of your experiences being a Woman in Games?

I am a team player. I don’t look at me and think female, Mother of three. I look at me and see Game Dev. Most of the industry looks and me and sees Game Dev, that is the way it should be. I have had a few occasions where I have been ignored by a few of the male Game Devs who presume I am someone’s wife or girlfriend rather than a Developer myself, which has been a bit annoying.

How can women in Video Games help each other?

I don’t believe it is a case of helping each other. It is nice to meet up with other girls in the industry, sometimes as I miss girly things being with the boys all the time but if you want to be the best then be it. It doesn’t matter if you are male or female. I think it is important that everyone male or female is recognised for good work! I don’t want to be special just because of my sex.

How can people continue to support and drive females working in games?

Be inclusive, don’t assume things. That girl in the group may also be a game developer and might even be a better one than you. Before women get to the workplace teach girls at Primary level to code. Make it acceptable socially to be a girl geek and let toys be toys, not boy’s toys and girl’s toys.

What are you working on now, what do you have planned for the future?

We are getting Splemy ready for iOS and Android. I am also helping organise the next big Gamayo ( Game Makers Yorkshire ) event in April as we have over 500 members. As for the future who knows?