Train2Game News Women in Games Ambassador programme 

Women in Games, the not for profit, games industry diversity organisation, today announced the launch of its Ambassador programme, sponsored by Women Techmakers, with 43 individual Ambassadors from across the UK and Europe supporting women and girls in understanding the games industry and the opportunities there are within it.
The Ambassador programme from Women in Games exists to grow the membership of the organisation, to help it increase the reach and scale of its programmes and help it achieve the strategic goal of doubling the number of women in games over 10 years.

Ambassadors are expected to reach out to young women at school, college and university locally in their region to encourage them to consider the games industry as a career. They will also reach out to the local public, regional industry and educational leaders and local government to form partnerships and long term strategic relationships.

Google’s Women Techmakers initiative provides visibility, community, and resources for women in technology, implementing global scalable initiatives to support and empower women in the industry.

The first Ambassadors for Women in Games are announced today as Alex Jones, Jade Leamcharaskul, Amelia James, Rhoda Daly, Steph McStea, Leoni Smith, Rory Jackson, Terri Mardel, Alex Grahame, Catherine Wooley, Jessica Curry, Adrienne Law, Amanda Blatch, Amrita Bharij, Amy Parish, Amy Yu, Ashley Riza, Becky Jowsey, Bex Edmondson, Carleigh Morgan, Chella Ramanan, Gareth Johns, Hazel Turnbull, Jess Magnus, Jodie Azhar, Karen Cham, Karen Hedger, Kate Killick, Laurence Bouvard, Liz Mercuri, Lorraine Ansell, Maria Fernandes-Hermida, Martine Spaans, Michael Corinus, Michelle Tilley, Monique Boddington, Nida Ahmad, Nika Droravic, Rachael Gregg-Smyth, Sandra Chau, Sharon Toliani-Sage, Tabitha Huchon and Timea Tabori.

Marie-Claire Isaaman, CEO of Women in Games commented: “We are delighted to have the support of Google’s Women Techmakers for the launch of our Women in Games Ambassador programme. During our 2016 European Women in Games Conference I ran a workshop to initiate this scheme and the enthusiasm and drive of the individuals who attended was extraordinary. We are extremely excited to see what our Ambassadors will achieve and confident that this initiative will have substantial impact in supporting us with our strategic goals.”

Rupert Whitehead, Developer Relations Programs Lead, UK, Ireland and Netherlands at Google said: “Women Techmakers and Google are proud to support the Women in Games Ambassador programme. This will grow awareness of the amazing variety of opportunities that are available for women in technology in what is a thriving and creative games industry. Seeing women already in these roles sharing their story is a powerful way of achieving this.”

Train2Game News Women in Games New Ambassadors

Women in Games, the not for profit, games industry diversity organisation, today announced the names of the first companies to be appointed as Corporate Ambassadors.
Women in Games is recruiting a number of Corporate as well as individual Ambassadors to support the growth of the Women in Games organisation, to help the organisation increase the reach and scale of its programmes and help it achieve the strategic goal of doubling the number of women in games over 10 years.

The first 4, founding corporate Ambassadors are:

Io-Interactive from Copenhagen, Denmark

Paradox Interactive from Stockholm, Sweden

Techland from Wroclaw and Warsaw, Poland

Wooga from Berlin, Germany

Ambassadors will reach out to women in all cities and regions of the UK and Europe and grow the Women in Games network. They will reach out to young women at school and university to encourage them to consider the games industry as a career. They will also reach out to regional leaders and governments to form corporate partnerships and long term strategic relationships.

Corporate Ambassadors are leading games companies in Europe with a professional standing in their country and a commitment to engage and promote more diversity.

At last week’s European Women in Games Conference representative from the four companies were invited on stage to introduce their companies. Pictured with David Smith from Women in Games are Henriette Lønn Jenssen, Junior Sound Designer and Sidsel Marie Hermansen, Game Designer from IO Interactive, John Hargelid, CIO from Paradox Interactive and Marie-Blanche Stossinger from Wooga. Also present but not pictured was Paulina Basta, Head of HR from Techland.

“I am convinced that only the most diverse team can deliver the best possible product for our global audience”, commented Jens Begemann, founder & CEO, Wooga. “We’re honoured to serve as a corporate ambassador for Women in Games and are looking forward to supporting the many extremely talented women we already have in our industry as well as showcasing the games industry as an excellent career option for girls and young women.”

Nikola Nielsen, HR Manager at Io-Interactive commented: “We are delighted to be able to support Women in Games and help promote diversity in our wonderful industry to the next generation of game creators. This is a great initiative and one we are very passionate about.” 

Fredrik Wester, CEO of Paradox Interactive said “Our philosophy is that by bringing people with different backgrounds, competences, experiences and ideas together, we will continue to grow as a successful industry. An industry that today is present in every aspect of society.”

Paulina Basta, Head of HR at Techland commented: “Techland is very proud to be a part of this Women in Games initiative. Diversity and inclusion topics are very close to our hearts and we are eager to promote the idea in our company and our part of the world.”

David Smith, Founder of Women in Games, said: “Women in Games is delighted to partner with these 4 Founding Corporate Ambassadors. We look forward to working with these companies to further diversity across Europe in the months and years ahead.”

Train2Game News 2015 Women in Games Conference

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The fifth annual European Women in Games (WIG) Conference is to take place on Wednesday 2nd September at the University of Westminster. The conference continues to grow in both size and stature and this year’s event is expected to be the biggest yet.

As in previous years the day’s conference will comprise a mix of keynote speeches, panel discussions, workshops and the European Women in Games Hall of Fame Awards. The line-up of speakers and panellists will reflect the diverse talent that exists in the games industry. This year the focus will be on acquiring the skills and knowledge needed to get an entry-level position and for career progression in the games development industry. Speakers confirmed so far include Andy Payne Chairman of Ukie, Vicky Smalley CTO Small Jelly and Claire Tavernier Owner and MD StoryTech Life.

Women in Games is committed to ensuring that the conference is  as accessible as possible and therefore early bird ticket prices have been set at £50 to open it up to as many delegates as possible. Full price tickets will be £95. In addition the organisers are keen to stress that this is an inclusive event and male delegates are equally very welcome.

Women in Games has also had a makeover with a new logo and dropping Jobs from its title.

Announcing the conference details, CEO Jenny Richards-Stewart said “This year’s conference programme is shaping up to be our best yet, in terms of content which will help delegates’ fast track their careers in the games industry. We wanted to focus on practical subjects and have also introduced workshops covering the main disciplines of games development. As always we have tried to keep the ticket prices as low as possible so that it is within the reach of students, entry level delegates and those working for small start-ups and Indies. I am looking forward to revealing more details of the conference programme in due course. We will also be announcing some exciting initiatives from Women in Games over the next few weeks.”

For further details about the conference and to buy tickets please visit www.ewigconf.com

Train2Game News Women in Games aiming to double females in industry

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The women in games organisation, Women in Games WIGJ, announced today that its core objective is to double the number of women in games working in the UK and European Games Industry by 2025.

The organisation recently reviewed its strategy with a group of interested parties including representatives from several publishers and developers and has identified a layer of initiatives that will be revealed in the coming weeks and months to accelerate the movement towards this goal. WIGJ is already in discussion with a number of industry groups including Ukie and STEMNET and hopes to collaborate with as many other interested parties as possible to make this dream a reality.

The Women in Games WIGJ network is open to both women and men. WIGJ believes firmly that encouraging more talented girls and young women to consider a career in the games industry will not be at the expense of others. The games industry needs to hire the most talented, creative people to compete with other industries in tech and the media. The games industry in the UK and throughout Europe is generating many new jobs though tax breaks and the continued growth of new formats. The growth of the games sector will create additional opportunities for all.

Recently appointed CEO, Jenny Richards-Stewart commented, “More girls and women playing games mean more women are interested in working in the games industry but we should not assume that this will solve the current gender imbalance without the industry doing more to welcome a more diverse workforce. Intel working with the IGDA demonstrated in January a significant commitment to bring more women and other diverse talent to the tech and games industries.  We want more companies to step forward on issues of diversity and inspire the next generation of talent .The games industry in the UK and Europe is keen to do more and we are here to help. We want the games industry to get behind this goal. ”

Dr Jo Twist, CEO of Ukie, said “Women represent 52% of regular players in the UK, but they only make up a small proportion of the games industry workforce, far behind other creative sectors. We have a shared responsibility as an industry to take action to ensure a diversity of people are inspired into a career in our sector from a young age, and stay in the sector. We are doing that via our Digital Schoolhouse programme as well as through the Video Game Ambassador scheme, and we actively encourage a diverse range of people to put themselves up for Ukie Board election and to speak at events.”

To find out more visit http://www.womeningamesjobs.com/

Train2Game News Interview with Fee Stewart on Women in Games

Fiona StewartFormerdroid Managing Director and former Train2Game student Fee Stewart has made a list of the top 100 women in gaming. We interviewed her about what the nomination meant to her and what it’s like being female in the UK Games Industry.

What does it mean to be included in the list of Top 100 Women In Games?

Personally I am chuffed to be amongst such great women in the industry. It feels great that there is so many women in the industry to be able to narrow it down to 100. I would now like to see the top 100 males too though now! It’s all about inclusion and diversity at the end of the day.

When going about your work, do you see yourself as one of the UK’s high flying women in Gaming?

Definitely not lol. I think I will always feel humble when looking at what others do. I love this industry with an extreme passion so have never felt that I am “Working” when doing what I love. I still feel I haven’t actually achieved anything worthy yet.

How important do you think this kind of event is to females in the Games Industry?

It’s nice to be included. It is nice to see that there are other girls in the industry and if it encourages more girls to join it then it is worth doing but at the end of the day it is equally important that everyone, male and female are made to feel inclusive into the industry.

What are some of your experiences being a Woman in Games?

I am a team player. I don’t look at me and think female, Mother of three. I look at me and see Game Dev. Most of the industry looks and me and sees Game Dev, that is the way it should be. I have had a few occasions where I have been ignored by a few of the male Game Devs who presume I am someone’s wife or girlfriend rather than a Developer myself, which has been a bit annoying.

How can women in Video Games help each other?

I don’t believe it is a case of helping each other. It is nice to meet up with other girls in the industry, sometimes as I miss girly things being with the boys all the time but if you want to be the best then be it. It doesn’t matter if you are male or female. I think it is important that everyone male or female is recognised for good work! I don’t want to be special just because of my sex.

How can people continue to support and drive females working in games?

Be inclusive, don’t assume things. That girl in the group may also be a game developer and might even be a better one than you. Before women get to the workplace teach girls at Primary level to code. Make it acceptable socially to be a girl geek and let toys be toys, not boy’s toys and girl’s toys.

What are you working on now, what do you have planned for the future?

We are getting Splemy ready for iOS and Android. I am also helping organise the next big Gamayo ( Game Makers Yorkshire ) event in April as we have over 500 members. As for the future who knows?

Train2Game News Women In Games Conference

Women in GamesThe fourth annual European Women in Games Conference is to take place on Wednesday September 10 at London South Bank University.

The programme will feature a range of current topics including setting up your own games company, games industry career advice to how to encourage more school children to consider a career in the games industry.

As in previous years the day’s conference will comprise a mix of keynote speeches, panel discussions and the European Women in Games Hall of Fame Awards. The line-up of speakers and panellists will reflect the diverse talent that exists in the games industry. Key note speakers will include Emma Mulqueeny, the founder of Rewired State and Young Rewired State and a Commissioner for the Speaker’s Commission on Digital Democracy and Andrew Webber, Marketing Director – Audience Acquisition at Microsoft. More speakers and panellists will be announced over the coming weeks.

The conference has steadily grown in popularity since its inaugural event in 2011. This year’s event is expected to have the greatest attendance yet helped by the early bird ticket price of £20 per person.

This makes the conference much more accessible to students and entry level games industry professionals. In addition the organisers are keen to stress that this is an inclusive event and male delegates are equally very welcome.

Announcing the details of the conference organiser David Smith said, “The European Women in Games Conference has steadily grown over the past four years. The 2014 event will help all industry professionals’ progress their careers and we are making it accessible to everyone. I’d like to thank London South Bank University for hosting the conference and making it possible for us to offer attractive ticket prices for a first rate and pertinent programme both for existing industry professionals as well as those hoping to join our industry.”

For further details about the conference and to buy tickets please visit http://ewigconference2014.eventbrite.co.uk

Train2Game student Fee Stewart presents her 2nd Video Diary

Train2Game student video diary from  Train2Game Artist & Animator Fee Stewart. In her second Train2Game video diary, Fee tells us about her time at The EuroGamer Expo and Women In Games Conference, and reveals her latest TMA score. Watch Fee’s video diary below, right here on The Train2Game blog.

You can also see Fee’s first Train2Game video diary here.

What are your thoughts on Fee’s second Train2Game video diary?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game news: Interesting Guardian feature on women in game development

Train2Game students should have a look at this article on the The Guardian website. Titled ‘Game changers: the women who make video games’ it features some of the best female game development talent out there and examines what can be done to get more women into the games industry.

Of course, there are plenty of women currently on Train2Game courses as we speak.

“I think young girls need to have their eyes opened to the different avenues open to them in games,” said games writer Rhianna Pratchett, who has worked on games including Heavenly Sword and Mirror’s Edge.

“They can be artists, animators, writers, designers, producers, programmers … We need to get them fired up about technology and find the Ada Lovelaces of the future. I think both the industry and the educational system have a role to play to achieve this. There are so many great female role-models within the games industry, but they rarely get the exposure they deserve.”  she added.

Rhianna Pratchett was part of BAFTA’s Games Writers Panel discussion, which recently became available to listen to via podcast. Find out how to listen to it, and see the rest of Train2Game’s BAFTA Games Writers Panel coverage, here on the Train2Game blog.

Other female game developers who feature in The Guardian article includes Deus Ex: Human Revolution co-writer Mary DeMarle, and Uncharted 3 Director Amy Hennig. The women in video games piece certainly does make interesting reading for Train2Game students.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on the article? What do you think can be done to encourage more women into game development?

Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

(Source: The Guardian)

Train2Game students could be among them? The Games Industry needs ‘a greater number of female graduates’ .

 

There are plenty of women on Train2Game courses aspiring to work in the game industry, they may therefore be interested to hear that LucasArts creative Director Clint Hocking says the games industry needs more female employees.

In a column in Edge magazine – a useful publication for Train2Game students – Hocking criticised what he called the ‘Viking Culture’ of the game industry, and says that it needs to change.

“Game development studios and their teams are largely staffed in the same way that Viking longships were crewed. Consequently, the culture is overflowing with beer and pent-up aggression, and a very significant portion of our overall cultural output is fart jokes. I think we can do better.”

He adds that establishing a more balanced culture in the games industry would go a long way to games reaching a “truly mass market audience.”

Hocking believes the best way to do this is to encourage more women into the industry.

“This means that we need to better position the industry as a desirable workplace, one in which female artists, designers, programmers and project managers would want to be employed. It involves reaching out to universities and colleges to help them attract more female applicants to their programmes, enabling us to benefit from a greater number of female graduates.”

“Like the Viking expansion itself, this transformation probably needs to be driven from the bottom up. Like it or not, the culture onboard your ships is the culture you’re exporting. Fart jokes have their place in culture, but when fart jokes become your culture you have a problem.” he added.

There are plenty of women on Train2Game courses who definitely want to become part of the games industry, and there are certain organisations that could help them.

As reported by the Train2Game blog last month, the Women In Games Jobs event that takes place in September could be of great benefit to female Train2Game students.

And as posted by Train2Game Course Director Tony Bickley on the Train2Game forum, WIG will be holding networking event for women working, or planning to work in the games industry, during the Develop Conference later this month.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on Hocking’s comments? Is there too big a male culture in the games industry? Do you think it needs to change?

Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

[Source: GamesIndustry.biz]