Train2Game student industry experience diary: Chris Robinson at AppCrowd – Week 4

Train2Game Game Designer Chris Robinson is on a Train2Game work placement at AppCrowd. In his latest industry experience diary, Chris discusses designing levels and carrying out all important research.

Read what he has to say about his Train2Game work placement  here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game Scribd page.

You can read previous entries from Chris here, while there are also plenty more industry experience diaries from other students on the Train2Game Blog.

Train2Game news: Auto Club Revolution enters open beta

Train2Game students now have the opportunity to take part in the open beta for Auto Club Revolution, an online racing game from Gateshead based studio Eutechnyx.

Auto Club Revolution will let players be part of an online community, completing in single player challenges and allowing them to own, customise and upgrade their own officially licensed cars. The open beta will allow players to begin their permanent collection of cars and different achievements.

Train2Game students can sign up for the open beta by visiting the Auto Club Revolution official website.

The Train2Game Blog published a video interview with Eutechnyx Lead Programmer Dave Hawes in November last year, in which he offers advice on getting into the industry.

Beta testing is an excellent way for Train2Game students, especially those on the Games QA Tester course to practice their bug hunting skills. In a recent interview with The Train2Game Blog, Brawl Busters developers Rock Hippo told us that beta testing is “crucial” to the game development process.

Keep up with the latest Auto Club Revolution news here on The Train2Game Blog.

What are your initial impressions of Auto Club Revolution? Will you be taking part in the open beta?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game student industry experience diary: Ben Stoneman at Unity – weeks 3 &4

Train2Game student Ben Stoneman  is on a Train2Game work placement at Unity. In his latest industry experience diaries, he writes about using the Unity engine for animation.

Read what he has to say about his Train2Game work placement  here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game Scribd page.

More Train2Game industry experience diaries are right here on The Train2Game Blog. 

Train2Game student industry experience diaries: James Bouckley at Unity – week 3

Train2Game student James Bouckley  is on a Train2Game work placement at Unity. In this industry experience diary, James details how he’s been helping out at the studio.

Read what he has to say about his Train2Game work placement  here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game Scribd page.

More Train2Game industry experience diaries are right here on The Train2Game Blog. 

Train2Game news: EA’s advice on getting your first job in the games industry

Train2Game students can get some useful advice on getting a job in the games industry, in the latest instalment of EA’s ‘Breaking into the industry’ feature.

It provides advice from EA University Relations Specialist Iris Lin on how to get noticed when looking for that first job, even if you don’t have any ‘real-life’ experience of working in a games development studio.

“We understand that the majority of students don’t have any real life experience so early on in their careers, so details on school projects are very important.” said Lin discussing how to get noticed as a school leaver.

“Showing an interest in the gaming industry is important as well. Activities they are involved with outside of school are important too, such as game clubs and conferences and seminars they attend.”

She added that being patient and hardworking are key to securing that all important first job in the industry.

“Start with something little and build a strong foundation of your craft. It doesn’t matter if you are a software engineer or an artist.” said Lin.

“Be patient and don’t be discouraged by the rejections. No one is great overnight. Have an open mind and be a hard-working person, and with a great attitude you will get far.” the University Relations Specialist added.

The full Breaking into the Industry feature with Iris Lin is right here on the EA website.

Kingdoms of Amular: Reckoning Producer Benjamin Smith, Dead Space 2 game designer Brian Bartram, and EA Environment Artist Phillip Simmons are among those that have previously spoken to The EA blog, providing advice on how to get into the industry.

There’s more advice from industry professionals on getting into the industry right here on The Train2Game Blog.

As usual, leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game student diaries: Will Alexander at AppCrowd – week 4

Train2Game Artist Will Alexander is on a Train2Game work placement at AppCrowd. In this industry experience diary, Will details what he’s been up at the mobile and social game developer, including creating in-game characters.

Read what he has to say about his Train2Game work placement  here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game Scribd page.

You can read his previous diaries here, while there are also plenty of industry experience diaries from other students on the Train2Game Blog.

Train2Game news: Rayman Origins developer on benefits of ‘less is more’ game design

Train2Game game designers should find Rayman Origins designer Chris McEntee’s discussion of Ubisofts ‘rational design’ interesting, as he explains how he believes its key to success in game design.

“Rational design is all about eliminating unnecessary information, making things inherently readable, understandable and apparent, introducing mechanics in an orderly and easily digestible fashion, and preserving the learning and difficulty curves of a game, known as macro flow.” McEntee told Gamasutra in a huge feature on game design.

“In principle, it is best to provide a player with significantly interesting and deep mechanics that are well explored and exploited through clever rationalized level design, rather than injecting the game full of one-shot gameplay mechanics to feign depth.”

The Rayman Origins designer added that when it comes to game design, keeping it simple with a less is more approach is a good philosophy to follow.

“We try, as designers, to overstuff our games with content, ideas and objectives because we think that makes it more clever or fun,” said McEntee.

“When we rationalize our game systems and keep things simple but deep, we can truly create a good and meaningful gameplay experience that is also efficient for the team and easy to troubleshoot through iterative play-testing.

“I feel that rationalization is one of the keys to success in the game design field.” he added

Train2Game students can read the full 8 page feature on game design over at Gamasutra.

What are your thoughts on the idea of less being more as a philosophy for game design?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game student industry experience diary: Craig Moore at DR Studios – week 17

Train2Game Game Designer Craig Moore is on a Train2Game work placement at DR Studios. In his latest industry experience diary, he discusses being busy and the advantages and disadvantages of taking risks.

Read what Craig has to say about his Train2Game work placement  here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game Scribd page.

Train2Game news: The Witcher 2 makes you “face the consequences of your actions”

Train2Game Blog readers who play The Witcher 2 will need to “face the consequences of your actions” whatever decisions you make when the RPG gets its Xbox 360 release.

That’s what lead level artist Marek Ziemak told CVG about the game that CD Projeckt have previously described as “The most complex and non-linear story ever told on Xbox 360″

“The spine of our whole game is the storyline and it’s a dark fantasy world where you have to make choices, then later on you have to face the consequences of your actions.” said Ziemak.

“We were looking for a way to make those consequences meaningful and really important for the players. To show that, we sometimes have to kill some characters, sometimes burn places and sometimes make huge changes in the game’s world.”

When asked if that meant CD Projeckt were making parts of the story that might only be seen by a handful of players, Ziemak responded that no matter what, players need to see what consequences their decisions have.

“It’s not always enough to tell you that someone died because of your choice, we want to show you those consequences, because you’re the man deciding, then we have to be prepared that you choose one option or the other.” he said.

“We may have to create twice as much content, but then, there’s twice as much fun!” The Witcher 2 developer added.

Find out more about the development of The Witcher 2: Assassin’s of Kings in The Train2Game Blog’s own interview with lead level artist Marek Ziemak from Gamescom last year.

Train2Game students have the opportunity to question The Witcher 2 developers CD Projekt during a special Q&A event at BAFTA next month. There’s more information about it here on The Train2Game Blog.

What are your thoughts on Ziemaks comments about consequences in The Witcher 2? Is it something that game developers need to put more focus on?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game student industry experience diaries: Jonny Robinson at DR Studios weeks 34 & 35

Train2Game designer Jonny Robinson is on a Train2Game work placement at DR Studios. In his latest industry experience diaries, describes “living my life dream” on his work placement and updates us on the progress of his Make Something Unreal Live team, Commando Kiwi.

Read what Jonny has to say about his Train2Game work placement  here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game Scribd page