Train2Game News Method Dominating WoW eSports

Powerhouse esports organization Method have officially achieved their 11th World First victory live from the Red Bull Gaming Sphere in London, defeating all nine bosses in the newest WoW raid before any other guild.

The Race to World First for Battle of Dazar’alor began last Thursday (31/01/19) and Method defeated the final boss, Mythic Jaina Proudmore, live in front of fans on Twitch on Tuesday (05/02/19).

Method were the first guild to ever broadcast a Race to World First when they defeated Battle for Azeroth’s opening raid, Uldir, in record time from the Red Bull Gaming Sphere in September last year.

Sco, Gingi, Narcolies, Chrispotter, Perfecto, Deepshades and Cayna, part of the 20 man Method raid guild, battled it out tirelessly to become the first guild in the world to take down Mythic Jaina. The Race to World First saw over 230k views across the Method Twitch channels, with Method’s official channel and guild master Scott “Sco” McMillan’s channel combined seeing 4.49M hours watched last week alone (28/01/19 – 03/02/19.)

“We’re incredibly proud to have achieved another World First. To see such amazing success in terms of viewership a second time around confirms that we’re onto something special by sharing our progress with the community,” said Scott ‘Sco’ McMillan, Co-Founder, Method. “The Red Bull Gaming Sphere has become the perfect base for us to attempt World Firsts. We’ve spent over 96 hours in the space during this raid alone, and having a comfortable environment that’s purpose built to support gaming definitely gave us a competitive edge. Not to mention the unlimited Red Bull to keep us alert and focused throughout.”

Method were the first organisation to recognise the viewership potential of a Race to World First in September when they live streamed their defeat of mythic G’huun, the final boss in Battle for Azeroth’s first raid from the Red Bull Gaming Sphere. Both of Method’s Race to World First streams have seen fantastic viewership and represent an exciting new direction for the esports scene, spearheaded by a world renowned esports organisation in Method.

Train2Game News Farming Simulator eSports League

After testing the waters in 2018 with the first season of the Farming Simulator Championship, GIANTS Software is ready to dive deeper into the world of eSports with the upcoming season two.

Major changes lie ahead, when the Farming Simulator Championship becomes the Farming Simulator League, a full-fledged eSports league with 10 tournaments across Europe. At the end of the season, the best teams will compete for the title of the Farming Simulator Champion and 100.000€ in prizes. Every single tournament will not only grant circuit points for the best teams, but also wield big prizes, bringing the total prize pool for season two up to a total of 250.000€

GIANTS Software teamed up with some of the industries finest for the upcoming league, partnering with Logitech G, Intel, noblechairs as well as long term partner Nitrado to provide the best experience possible to both, players and fans of the Farming Simulator League.

“We have a unique opportunity”, explains Christian Ammann, CEO of GIANTS Software and manager of the eSports division. “competitive farming is something people enjoy for years now, but it hasn’t been done in eSports so far. We have lots of eSports enthusiasts in our company who can’t wait to show the world that farming can indeed be fun and competitive at the same time. We believe we found the right mix of real farming and fun to play game elements to ensure everyone will find it entertaining.”

The game itself is changing as well. Not only will the new league be held in the brand new Farming Simulator 19, but it will also move from bale stacking to a competitive 3 vs 3 mode where teams challenge each other to determine who is the best on the field. The game will, of course, stand true to its roots in farming and combine real field work like harvesting with fun and challenging game elements. GIANTS Software will reveal more about the new game mode in the near future.

This is just the beginning, so keep an eye out for more information around the new Farming Simulator League in the near future.

Train2Game News Esports Academy Workshop

EOB Esports Academy, the UK’s first esports academy for anyone between the ages of 7 to 30 looking to understand the business of esports, is proud to announce a partnership with Riot Games for their first tournament at the Red Bull Gaming Sphere in London.

EOB Esports Academy aims to help guide new talent by offering opportunities to learn everything from esports team creation, event management through to game design and 3D modelling.

The team have partnered with Riot Games for their first tournament which will see 13 budding esports professionals take part in this one-of-a-kind course, funded by the Prince’s Trust. Over the last four weeks League of Legends players have been developing the skills needed to manage a successful team, understand the challenges and the roles of an esports player, and most importantly, understand how to work as a team.

The students have been involved in a series of masterclasses and workshops with esports players and industry professionals and will now come face to face in the final day of their course where their plans are put into action with their first tournament at the Red Bull Gaming Sphere in London on 19th August.

EOB Esports Academy’s creator Steven Godwin says, “Riot Games have been a big inspiration for starting the EOB Esports Academy, I could see how young people could become stronger individuals by playing League of Legends. The guys at Riot Games have been very supportive and through a chance meeting with Mo Fadl head of esports, we started making this course a reality.”

Mo Fadl, Head of Esports at Riot Games said: “Riot is committed to furthering the esports ecosystem and providing new talent with an opportunity to learn and grow. We are very excited to help the EOB Esports Academy with their first tournament. Having spoken to the students taking part I can already see myself working for them in the future!”

EOB Esports Academy runs a number of workshops and events throughout the year. If you would like to find out more information please visit: http://wuwomedia.com/

Train2Game News British eSports hits schools and colleges

The British Esports Association has announced details of its first full competitive gaming Championships for schools, colleges and alternative provision schools.

The not-for-profit organisation has entered into a partnership with streaming programme Twitch Student to grow the British Esports Championships and help give students support and opportunities.

In addition, a new partnership has been formed with AoC Sport (part of the Association of Colleges) and the British Esports Association to provide management and oversight of the competition via the College Esportscommittee. This new committee will ensure that esports is properly managed in colleges and is positioned as part of a balanced lifestyle alongside education and physical activity.

The British Esports Championships is for students aged 12-19, with each school or college allowed to enter teams for three different games. The first confirmed game is 5v5 League of Legends.

The Championships will begin on October 10th and run for two seasons, the first consisting of eight weeks of fixtures with breaks for half term and the second running in the New Year. The first six weeks will feature a Swiss tournament format, with Playoffs taking place during the remaining weeks.
Matches will take place for 90 minutes onafternoonsafter school or college, avoiding conflict with Wednesday afternoon sport or classes.

Depending on the number of sign ups, schools and colleges will be split into their respective regions. The top two from each region will get promoted to a Super League for Season 2.

The live finals are set to take place at the Insomnia gaming festival in Easter 2019 at the Birmingham NEC.

Team sign-ups will open in the first week of September and will close on September 26th. Visit the dedicated Championships information coming soon on www.britishesports.org to sign up or read more information.
In terms of partnerships, the British Esports Association will adopt the Twitch Student Program, which helps schools and colleges learn how to stream so that friends, parents and others can watch their matches and other gaming activities live online. It has already been working with a number colleges in the US, universities in the UK and now it’s embracing the UK schools and colleges space.

Twitch Student gives users access to ‘swag’ and privileges as they level up, such as special streaming features, subscription buttons and the chance to earn revenues, Twitch homepage promotions and more. It also helps students pitch their gaming ideas or community projects to teachers and schools.

Mark “Garvey” Candella, Twitch Director of Strategic Partnerships, commented: “The British Esports Association and Twitch Student program share a belief in the ability of students to grasp the entrepreneurial spirit inherent in gaming and esports, while applying their education in new and innovative ways.

“The combination of passion and education can only lead to more opportunities for themselves and this exciting industry. We are proud to work with the British Esports Association on helping students realise their potential through the practical experience this program creates.”

In addition to the support of Twitch, the new College Esports committee will be working with the British Esports Association to promote the Championships to colleges throughout the UK.

AoC Sport says it’s been encouraged by the work of the British Esports Association in drawing parallels between physical sports and esports, engaging with education as well as developing skills in communication, problem solving, teamwork and more.

Marcus Kingwell, Managing Director of AoC Sport, said: “We see esports as a route to engaging inactive students in colleges and encouraging them to engage in physical activity. We’re delighted to be working with the British Esports Association as part of the College Esports committee, ensuring that esports is properly managed in colleges and is part of a balanced lifestyle alongside education and physical activity.”

British Esports chair Andy Payne OBE added: “It’s fantastic to be teaming up with Twitch Student and AoC Sport and to have the backing of organisations well engrained in both gaming and college sports. We look forward to growing the British Esports Championships together.”

The announcement follows a successful pilot which took place in schools and colleges from January to April and saw Solihull School and Sunderland College win the respective Championships. The pilot allowed the British Esports Association to create a safe online environment for students aged 12-19 to play age-appropriate esports. It fostered talent, championed positive role models, promoted leadership, communication, creativity and teamwork skills and its work is supported by multiple government departments.

The pilot brought pupils together, improved relations with teachers, developed employability skills, helped schools raise awareness of their activities and secure funding. It also drew national attention including coverage from the BBC, Sky, Daily Mail and more.

The news also comes after British Esports appointed Natacha Jones as Student Esports Coordinator to develop the British Esports Championships.
Since January, Natacha has held the role of Twitch Student Program Manager at the National University Esports League, tracking the success of a pilot scheme for UK universities.

She will be working closely with schools and colleges as part of the British Esports Championships and helping them integrate with the Twitch Student Program.

If you want to find out more visit www.britishesports.org

Train2Game News Crypto Currency Trading Card Game

gumi Asia Pte. Ltd. (Location: Singapore) has started recruiting participants for the Closed Beta Test phase of Financie, a Blockchain x Trading Card Game that allows fans to support eSports players.

Interested participants can sign up for closed beta access at the Financie website: https://financie.io

Financie leverages blockchain technology and is currently in the research and development stage as a trading card game. gumi is planning to run Financie’s beta test in collaboration with teams and players from various parts of the world, and will be continuing to recruit eSports players who will be featured on the trading cards on an ongoing basis.

In addition to supporting their favorite eSports player by collecting their cards, fans will be able to experience various other perks and special rewards just for them as well as be able to purchase eSports Players’ trading cards during the closed beta.

Features and Benefits in Development

1. eSports players will appear on trading cards in this game. Fans will be able to purchase and use their trading cards to support them in their activities. The value of the various cards will be determined by the fans themselves in Financie.

2. Fans will be able to collect the cards and trade them with other fans. Using cards obtained will grant fans special perks, such as receiving one-to-one advice on gameplay. gumi will also continue to provide fans with more avenues to use their cards.

3. Cards are managed on the Ethereum (ERC20) Blockchain. As such, proof of ownership will always be publicly available, eliminating the potential for fraudulent activities. Fans will also be able to participate in Financie with confidence as personal information will not be disclosed during transactions such as purchasing cards.

The Closed Beta Test will run during June and July, 2018. Details will be sent to registered email addresses as they become available.

Train2Game News Play2Live let’s watchers control you

Decentralised streaming platform for eSports fans and gamers, Play2Live has today announced the introduction of interactive tasks for streamers, which will be set by viewers of the platform.

Viewers will be able to set tasks for streamers choosing different conditions, whilst utilising an advanced task manager. By introducing interactive tasks, Play2Live presents a new level of interaction between platform users and helps to establish the LUC (Level Up Coin) token economy – the sole mean of payment within the platform.

Implementing algorithms for real-time monitoring of video streaming, recognition of complex objects and video content all based on a neural network, viewers can set the price for their favourite streamer to perform a specific task. Tasks can include challenging the streamer to complete the game on the hardest difficulty level, or to use a specific weapon, equipment or skills within given period on a specific location, keep streaming for three hours straight or to start a stream on a different game, etc.

Tasks are voted on using LUC tokens and any other user can support the tasks with further LUC tokens, or by assigning a streamer their own tasks. The streamer can then decide to perform one, or all tasks being set and this will determine the number of LUC tokens they shall receive – In case of failure all tokens are returned to the viewers.

The use of a neural network will help to determine whether a task was accomplished by the streamer or not. The network will monitor the stream and with the highest precision decide if the task was accomplished. The task itself is formed as a smart contract with a deposit in LUC tokens, which is an analogue of the escrow function, with a deposit being made in LUC for the time the task is performed by the streamer. Most actively involved users will also receive rewards in LUC. This allows for gamification of the entire platform; the more actively users participate in various activities, the more tokens they earn.

Alexey Burdyko, CEO and founder at Play2Live said: “Play2Live facilitates numerous ways of interaction between a streamer and a viewer including a bilateral system of tasks, enhanced content generation process and many others. Compared to the simplistic chat communication and donation options provided by the existing platforms, it is a real step forward in terms of interaction. We use Computer Vision algorithm to analyse streaming videos. These are neural networks, trained for recognition on their own datasets, including Time Series and OCR, and HUD of games. We performed global optimization of algorithms to fasten system operation time. This will allow launching the analysis of the stream even on the equipment without GPU. In future, this will also allow to perform analysis on tape drive equipment, rather than on Play2Live servers, and transmit along with the video stream meta information with results of the analysis. We are pretty sure that implementation of such functionality will help to change the pattern of watching this kind of content forever.”

Vladislav Arbatov, CTO at Play2Live, has been responsible for training the neural network. Arbatov continued “Interactive tasks will be developed for each popular game, and by the end of the year such functionality will be available for more than 300 games. The internal system of the neural network training will allow to add new types of events as quickly as possible. We also plan to work closely with the user community – we will ask fans what tasks would be the most interesting for the particular game.”

Play2Live aims to combine blockchain technology with its streaming services, whilst offering 15 sources of revenue for participants – three times more compared to the streaming industry leaders. Streamers will be able to monetize their content in 11 ways versus the 4-5 available on existing platforms.

For more information please visit www.play2live.io

Train2Game News Will eSports be at the 2020 Olympics?

With eSports tournaments expected to feature in some form in the run-up to the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics, and millions of pounds of prize money up for grabs for existing tournaments, it is no surprise that the popularity of viewing competitive multiplayer video gaming is on the rise.

According to the latest Harris 24 survey conducted by Harris Interactive, almost half of UK respondents aged 16-54 believe they have great potential for a mass audience in the future (49%), while a fifth of those polled (19%) agree that eSports should form an official part of the Olympic Games.

Awareness of eSports

The latest study, which aimed to investigate the UK’s awareness and perception of eSports and the impact on brands who sponsor such events, reveals that over three-quarters of those surveyed (76%) have heard of the term “eSports” and that two-fifths (39%) are interested in watching.

Streaming services – such as YouTube Gaming, used by almost half of eSports viewers (48%), and Twitch (39%) – are rapidly driving awareness.

Fortnite, a relative newcomer, stands out as the compelling eSports title, together with long-standing franchises FIFA and Call of Duty. Such games are helping to broaden its audience, which remains a niche – 18% of the UK currently watch eSports – according to the study.

Deeper coverage of the top competitions and its inclusion in the Olympics could be the core drivers to create more of a mass-market appeal. While the latter is not without its controversy (only 19% agree it should be included and 45% have concerns about violent eSports games), there is broader agreement (38%) that having eSports in the Olympics would make the games connect better with younger generations.

Brand opportunities

The survey highlights hugely enticing brand sponsorship opportunities in the coming years. Over half of all UK respondents (51%) and over three-quarters of those who were eSports viewers (76%) say they are happy for brands to sponsor eSports.

Furthermore, over half of those questioned (53%) and over three-quarters of those who were also eSport viewers (76%) agree that brands who sponsor eSports benefit from the association.

Crucially, almost three-fifths of the 2,030 respondents (58%) claim that eSports can help sponsor brands connect with a younger and tech-savvy audience.

For players and teams involved in eSports, there is the appeal of major prize money. The International Dota 2 Championship saw teams battle for a fund in excess of $20m, while Epic Games recently announced a $100 million prize pool for eSports events featuring battle royale game Fortnite.

“It’s fair to say that entertainment is a driving force for watching eSports, with almost two-fifths (37%) of the public agreeing that they are very entertaining,” commented Steve Evans, Head of Entertainment at Harris Interactive. “What’s more, we can see from the survey that viewers are extremely receptive to brand association, which should encourage brands to invest in sponsorship opportunities afforded by popular eSports events, leagues and tournaments. The potential for brands to tap into younger, tech-savvy audiences is huge, and will only increase further as its popularity intensifies.”

A link to the full research can be found at: http://www2.harris-interactive.com/esportsreport

The eight-minute online survey was completed by 2,030 participants and was conceived, designed, fielded and analysed using the Harris 24 ultrafast polling service during May 2018.

Results are weighted to be representative of UK demographics by gender, age and region. To find out more, visit: http://harris-interactive.co.uk/solutions/harris-24/.

Train2Game Caffeine and eSports

Caffeine announced a deal with ESL, the world’s largest independent esports company, to bring esports content to Caffeine’s social broadcasting platform.

Live coverage kicks off this week with Counter-Strike: Global Offensive at the Intel® Extreme Masters (IEM) World Championship in Katowice, Poland on March 3 -5, 2018.

Caffeine was co-founded in April 2016 by Ben Keighran and Sam Roberts. The company is developing a social broadcasting platform that aims to fundamentally change the way people create, consume, share, and monetize live entertainment.

The partnership will see the formation of three social broadcasts of ESL content on the Caffeine platform: a live broadcast featuring AAA esports tournaments (Caffeine.tv/ESL_Live), a 24/7 Greatest Matches broadcast (Caffeine.tv/ESL_Replay), and a 24/7 Highlights broadcast (Caffeine.tv/ESL).

A “Made for Caffeine” esports talk show, The Magazine, will premiere later this spring. Each broadcast will use Caffeine’s social, real-time features to bring a more personal and friendly experience to live-streamed esports.

“We couldn’t be more thrilled to be working with ESL. We want to bring friends together around the content they love in a casual, friendly way, and what better way to do that then to host the world’s most popular esports gaming company’s content on Caffeine,” said Ben Keighran, CEO of Caffeine. “This week, fans from around the world will be able to join each other and tune in to ESL live coverage, with highlights of the best events from this year and previous years following close behind.”

“Caffeine brings a new type of social experience to ESL’s esports content,” said Nik Adams, Senior Vice President, Global Media Rights & Distribution of ESL. “ESL is at the frontier of new streaming concepts and new technologies. One of ESL’s goals is to expand esports to new audiences and the partnership with Caffeine brings us one step closer to our goal.”

As a social broadcasting platform, Caffeine users find content based on the people they follow in their social circles and come together to share that content. Personal conversations between friends and broadcasters are given preference, enabling more meaningful social engagements while disposing of toxic chatter and endless feeds of meaningless comments. Since Caffeine is built on its own infrastructure, it will deliver ESL’s content and conversations with no latency, allowing broadcasters to answer questions in real-time and build stronger relationships with their fans.

To watch ESL on Caffeine and get notified of upcoming events, fans need only sign up for a Caffeine account, follow the ESL account of their choosing, and then invite their friends to join them as they tune in.

ESL on Caffeine:
– Live content of AAA eSports tournaments.
– Recent highlights from global tournaments.
– Replayed broadcasts from some of ESLs greatest matches, shown “live” for the first time on Caffeine.
– “The Magazine”, an eSports talk show that will premiere later in 2018, which allows broadcasters to present the latest esports news live, and to react in real-time to audience questions.

For more information or to start broadcasting your content, visit www.caffeine.tv .

Train2Game News British Esports partners with Enemy of Boredom Academy


The British Esports Association has entered into a partnership with the Enemy of Boredom Esports (EOB) Academy, a series of workshops for young people backed by the Prince’s Trust.

The EOB Esports Academy offers education programmes for 14-30 year olds, which are designed to help young people and unemployed people learn new skills, access new opportunities and find work.

The courses aim to build confidence and provide a qualification. They promote teamwork and communication skills through League of Legends, and also include game design, journalism, 3D printing, virtual reality and social media skills.

Each workshop or course is hosted by WUWO Media, an agency which has been designing educational programmes for the creative industries since 2012.

EOB Esports Academy Watford has been in operation since May 2017, while the London Academy opened in September 2017. Another academy will launch in Birmingham in 2018.

Enemy of Boredom is also planning on hosting after-school clubs for younger pupils as well as holiday clubs. In addition, it’s running a one-week game design course in Peterborough in October, including Rocket League training.

WUWO Media is also working on the EOB League, a grassroots esports schools league for secondary schools and 6th forms, which will start with four schools in South London taking part.

The initiative aligns well with the British Esports Association – the not-for-profit national body set up to support grassroots esports – which held a series of esports clubs for children in the summer at Maida Vale Library, promoting communication, teamwork and cognitive skills.

The British Esports Association will be working with WUWO Media/EOB to help shape and promote the academies and to give talks at events. In particular, the association’s projects executive Rob Allen – who has extensive League of Legends coaching experience – will be working closely with the workshops.

Steven Godwin, creator of the Enemy of Boredom Esports Academy, commented: “It’s a great feeling to be teaming up with others to create a positive and strengthened future. WUWO Media’s EOB Esports Academy is delighted to be partnering with the British Esports Association.

“We share a common goal, and that’s to promote esports, educate young people and provide grassroots participation. Having the knowledge and skills available from British Esports helps the young people at the EOB Esports Academy build confidence, gain qualifications and gain careers.”

Andy Payne OBE, chair of the British Esports Association, added: “The work of Enemy of Boredom is important and aligns well with our goals at the British Esports Association – to promote, improve and inspire.

“Getting people interested and involved in esports from a young age can not only help bolster the industry in the long-term, but it also gives something positive back to the community, promoting teamwork, communication and development.”

The Prince’s Trust said in a statement: “We are delighted to partner with WUWO Media on their EOB Esports Academy to help young people gain the skills and experience they need to forge a career in the esports, digital and cyber industries. By attending events, hearing from guest speakers and learning from experts, this course will inspire the group and open their eyes to different employment opportunities within the digital world.”

Train2Game ESports beneficial for children


The British Esports Association, the not-for-profit national body set up to support grassroots competitive gaming, has found that esports can be a beneficial activity for children when played in moderation.
The Association partnered with Westminster City Council and DinoPC for a free two-hour after-school esports training club, running every Tuesday for a month at Maida Vale Library.

The idea was to bring in 10 different children each week from local schools, aged 8 to 14, and give them a taster session on esports, including the careers available and the skills it can develop. The training club featured games of Rocket League, coaching, casting (aka match commentary) and journalism segments, followed by a Q&A.

British Esports has published a video and extensive PDF report reviewing the event, stating some of the key findings.

The pilot scheme was a sellout, with more children and parents signing up to attend than space would allow, showing there is real demand for more regular clubs in schools and libraries in the future. It also secured national and specialist press coverage.

Children and organisers identified several benefits and skills that the esports pilot promoted, including strategic thinking, teamwork, communication, leadership, performance skills and confidence. These skills are transferable and can benefit children in other areas, such as schoolwork, physical sports and general wellbeing.

Nic Carnelutti, marketing manager for DinoPC – which provided the systems for the esports sessions – said: “We believe the educational aspects of what the British Esports Association aims to achieve are highly beneficial to children and younger audiences.

“This scheme encourages young people to learn teamwork and participate in a challenge – building up their social skills which can then be used in other aspects of life.”

British casters Harry “DocDa” Evans and Ryan “Flakes” Oliver were on hand to teach the children commentating techniques.

One of the children, 13-year-old Mohammed Badamasi from Paddington Academy, added: “I think it was extremely fun and I really enjoyed casting and working with my team to win. Commentating is fun, Rocket League is fun – we had to work as a team to score. I would absolutely love to do this again 1000%.”

All of the children that took part in the pilot scheme said they would like to take part in a more regular esports club, either at their own school, nearby library or at a similar event in their area. For more feedback from the participants, please read British Esports’ full library PDF report.

Nick Fuller, Tri-borough Libraries Children’s Services Manager, Schools Library Service, Maida Vale Library, commented: “The new initiative between The British Esports Association and Westminster Libraries offers children a new and exciting experience, which is not only popular and fun, but also develops important skills for such as their strategic skills, emphasizing the need for teamwork and making computer gaming more social. 

“The initiative will help to raise the profile of libraries to young people and a wider audience that libraries are a community space, offering new, exciting and fun activities that many would not associate with libraries. It also gives the children involved the opportunity to mix with other children from different schools and backgrounds.

“The Library Service is hoping that the partnership with British Esports will grow and that the esports offer can continue and be rolled out to more libraries, envisioning thriving leagues and competitions in libraries and across the service.”

Each child received a British Esports certificate, T-shirt and cap after the event.

Going forwards, the Association aims to help other schools and libraries roll out their own esports clubs for children.

Dominic Sacco, Content Director at the British Esports Association, said: “The idea is to better educate Britain regarding the benefits of esports, and to show parents, teachers and children there are viable career paths within the industry.

“There is a real demand for regular clubs at libraries and schools. And by targeting the younger demographic, we are looking at the bigger long-term picture with the goal of creating more British esports talent in the future.

“Also, with the likes of Ukie hosting the Digital Schoolhouse children’s esports tournaments, and several universities starting to offer esports modules, it’s a very exciting time for esports in Britain. We look forward to future developments.”