Train2Game news: Valve reveal how CS:GO beta heat maps influence design decisions

Train2Game News readers should find this interesting; Valve has released data about the science of player actions during the Counter-Strike: Global Offensive beta, and how it ultimately effects their design decisions.

The developer has released heat maps of the map de_train showing where 6.5 million bullets have been fired during the beta. You can see it in full here.

“Recently we have discussed how we incorporate feedback into our design decisions. In addition to valuable feedback on the forums, another important form of feedback we receive is gameplay data.” read an update on the Counter-Strike blog.

“Our data collection is extensive. We track nearly every player action, from individual bullets fired to weapon purchases, and the resulting data can be used to help us evaluate game design decisions.”

The post added the heat map helps the Valve development team gain insights into player habits.

“A straightforward way to visualize the data we collect is through heat maps. Heat maps can reveal player preferences, choke-points in maps, sight-lines for snipers, and much more.”

In an interview with The Train2Game Blog , Valve’s Chet Faliszek said that beta testing is an important part of the game development process for CS:GO.

“It’s really important to us because we’re going to let that drive the release date,” he said.

“Because we’re really looking to get the feedback from the community over the changes we’ve made. We’ve brought over some stuff that was good from Counter-Strike: Source and we’ve brought over some stuff that was good from 1.6, so it’s going to be interesting to see how the communities react” Faliszek added.

There’s more Counter-Strike: Global Offensive news right here on The Train2Game Blog.

What are your thoughts on Valve using heat maps to help make design decisions? Are you taking part in the CS:GO beta?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game news: Your chance to join the Counter-Strike: Global Offensive beta

Train2Game students have the opportunity to register for a Counter-Strike: Global Offensive beta key.

To be in with a chance of receiving a CS:GO beta key, visit the Counter-Strike blog and follow the link to complete a survey using Steam. The survey asks questions based on your previous experience with Counter-Strike, favourite weapons and some other more general information.

Valve are keen to state that there are no wrong answers, and it’s likely that they’ll need CS: GO beta testers from a variety of different backgrounds.

“Over the coming months we will make selections from the survey participants. Sometimes we might add experienced players, other times new players. Sometimes 1.6 players, sometimes CSS players, sometimes people who have played neither.” said the Counter-Strike blog post.

Valve plan to expand the CS: GO beta as it goes on, with the idea that it’ll eventually transition into being the full game

In an interview with The Train2Game Blog , Valve’s Chet Faliszek said that beta testing is an important part of the game development process for CS:GO, and ultimately it’s player feedback that’ll drive the eventual full release date.

“It’s really important to us because we’re going to let that drive the release date,” Faliszek told us

“Because we’re really looking to get the feedback from the community over the changes we’ve made. We’ve brought over some stuff that was good from Counter-Strike: Source and we’ve brought over some stuff that was good from 1.6, so it’s going to be interesting to see how the communities react” the Valve writer added.

Read The Train2Game Blog interview with Chet Faliszek on Counter-Strike: Global Offensive here.

Keep reading The Train2Game Blog for the latest beta testing opportunities.

Will you be attempting to grab a CS: GO beta key?

Leave your comments on The Train2Game Blog, or on The Train2Game Forum.

Train2Game news: CS:GO beta delayed, but here’s a reminder of the significance of beta testing

Train2Game students who picked up Counter-Strike: Global Offensive closed beta keys at the Eurogamer Expo will need to a bit longer to get involved because it’ll miss the planned October launch.

Valve’s Chet Faliszek  – who spoke to the Train2Game blog at Eurogamer last month –  says the delay comes after feedback from professional players.

“They gave us a lot of feedback on things we should get in the game before we release it, otherwise we’re going to be getting a lot of bug reports or a lot of feedback and it would just be redundant,” he explained

“There’s going to be things we’re going to release it with knowing we need to add more, we need to do more. But just knowing there’s some feel and some just operating the game issues that need to be resolved first. We want to get those done first.”

Faliszek said the beta will accommodate 10,000 players, it has no official end date and it’s the beta testers who’ll say when CS:GO is ready to be released.

“We have no mandate from anybody of when we have to ship this. So we’re more than happy to just keep working on this until it’s ready to ship.

“By the end of it, everyone will be playing the game. It will be the released game that you’re playing and then at some point we’ll say, ‘OK we’re going to officially release it.’

His comments on beta testing and a release date echo those he told the Train2Game blog at the Eurogamer Expo.

“It’s really important to us because we’re going to let that drive the release date,” said Faliszek when asked about the importance of beta testing to game development.

“Because we’re really looking to get the feedback from the community over the changes we’ve made. We’ve brought over some stuff that was good from Counter-Strike: Source and we’ve brought over some stuff that was good from 1.6, so it’s going to be interesting to see how the communities react.”

The Valve man also told the Train2Game blog that modding is a ‘really good way’ to get into the industry. Meanwhile, End of Nations Senior QA Tester Karl Tars told us that beta testing is potentially a good route into QA.

Train2Game students will be aware that beta tests are used by many developers to tweak their games, but as the Train2Game blog reported last month, Battlefield 3 developer DICE believe some gamers misunderstand the meaning of ‘beta test’

What are your thoughts on the CS:GO beta? Are you going to be involved? If so, what are you looking for?

Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

[Source: CVG]