Train2Game student studios Commando Kiwi, Derp Studios, Digital Mage and Indigo Jam launching 2012.

Train2Game  students are launching four new development studios in 2012 as part of ‘Make Something Unreal Live,’ a competitive process designed to accelerate their careers by giving them the tools and resources needed to release games for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch this spring.

The studios are Commando Kiwi, Derp Studios, Digital Mage and Indigo Jam.

The first titles released by the studios will be based on the Fighting Fantasy series of books created by Ian Livingston and Steve Jackson.

Train2Game and Epic Games have created the ‘Make Something Unreal Live’ competition where students are challenged to create their own studios and develop games for the iOS platform using Epic Games’ Unreal Development Kit. The winning studio will receive a full source, commercial Unreal Engine 3 licence for iOS as well as gain invaluable professional experience in the games industry.

As part of the competition process, students competed in the Train2Game and Epic Game Jam last November. The Game Jam had teams facing off against each other to create full games to a set deadline and to a professional brief. Continuing this process, students have created four new studios from their original teams to launch games at this year’s The Gadget Show Live.

At this huge event, they will reveal their new projects to the world, each finalising a full game for distribution. Key industry icons will be on hand to aid and advise with game designs as the studios compete to win a full Unreal Engine licence and a holiday to Aquacity in Slovakia, www.aquacity.sk.

“Train2Game courses aim to teach students how to work professionally in the games industry. Helping them launch their first studio gives them invaluable, hands on, in the field experience of what it’s like to create and distribute their own games.” said Train2Game Course Director Tony Bickley.

The games are being developed using Epic Games’ UDK, the free edition of the award-winning Unreal Engine 3, helping students gain experience with tools used by leading studios around the world. During the process, students have their work reviewed, critiqued and mentored by a series of Train2Game tutors, current industry leaders and game specialists.

The final games will be distributed globally on the App Store and launched at this year’s The Gadget Show Live, the premier consumer show taking place from April 10-15, 2012 in Birmingham.

Train2Game: Minecraft developer Mojang streaming 60 hour Game Jam this weekend

Train2Game students can get an insight into how Mojang develop games this weekend, when the Minecraft developer live streams their 60 hour “Mojam”

Starting this Friday, Mojang will be making a brand new game, with the theme and genre being decided through a public vote which you can take part in at www.mojang.com

And not only are Mojang making a brand new game, they’ve also teamed up with Humble Bundle to raise money for charity. The team will be offering incentives for you to donate to the 60 hour project, while there will also be opportunities to get involved in Q&A sessions with Mojang developers, something that would sure to be useful to Train2Game students.

For more information, check out the Humble Bundle Mojam video below.

We’ve previously shown you Bethesda’s Skyrim Game Jam, which saw Bethesda developers given a week to be creative.

Train2Game students know all about Game Jams, as Train2Game has held two 48 hour long Game Jams, with the four winning teams at the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, moving onto a Make Something Unreal Live at The Gadget Show Live, where they have the opportunity to win a fully licensed UDK Ios development kit.

For previous news from Mojang, see The Train2Game Blog.

What are your thoughts on Mojam? Will you be tuning into the live streams? What would you ask the team?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game news: Bethesda internal Skyrim Game Jam video showcases potential DLC

Train2Game students who took part in last year’s Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, and Train2Game student fans of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim will be very interested in this new video from Bethesda.

It demonstrates the Skyrim development team created when they had their own week long internal game jam in which the only rules were “Do anything you want, and add it to the game.” Additions included new weapons, new creatures, new abilities, a really, really, giant mud crab and much more.

And speaking before the video was shown at the D.I.C.E summit, Bethesda’s Todd Howard hinted that some of the Game Jam creations could be added to Skyrim as DLC or free updates in future. Train2Game students can watch the video below to see what Bethesda created during their week long Game Jam.

Of course, as reported by The Train2Game Blog, the recently released Skyrim mod tools allow anyone to create their own additions to the Bethesda game.

Train2Game has held two 48 hour long Game Jams for Train2Game students, with the four winning teams at the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, moving onto a Make Something Unreal Live at The Gadget Show Live, where they have the opportunity to win a fully licensed UDK Ios development kit.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on the Skyrim Game Jam? How important do you think such things can be to both game development, and improving as a game developer?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

[Source: Joystiq]

Train2Game news: Epic Games provide CV writing advice in Develop feature

Train2Game students who are already attempting to find work in a games industry should definitely check out Develop Online for advice from Epic Games on how to write the perfect CV.

The article sees Epic Games recruiter Tim Johnson give anyone job hunting in the games industry ten tips for an excellent CV. The tips, listed on Develop Online as part of a New Year, New Jobs feature, make excellent reading for Train2Game students who are keen to take that first step into the industry.

Epic’s tips for an excellent CV are as follows:

1. Use spell check.

2. Make sure that your CV is put into a universally accepted format (MS Word, PDF). Please don’t use a text editor to write your CV.

3. Clearly and concisely list your responsibilities; four or five bullet points are a lot easier to read than a paragraph of text.

4. Include links to work you have created or authored.

5. Make sure you include a link to samples or a portfolio on your resume.

6. Include both your phone number and e-mail address. Sometimes, a hiring manager or recruiter will actually want to call you.

7. Leave the fancy fonts and tables for your portfolio. A lot of companies store resumes in an applicant tracking system, so the more straightforward your resume is, the better.  In short, make it easy to read.

8. Include the companies you have worked for along with the title you have held at each company.

9. Make an effort to use industry standard key words to explain your job duties and responsibilities.

10. Use spell check. Yes, I said it twice, but a resume with misspelled words is a really bad way to make a good first impression.

They’re all important things Train2Game students should consider when compiling a CV!  Of course, as reported by the Train2Game blog, there are some Train2Game students who’ve already been fortunate enough to find work in the industry.

If that isn’t enough advice for you, Epic Games Cliff Bleszinski has also given his own unique guidance on how to stand out in the games industry, which you can see here on The Train2Game Blog.

Train2Game the Epic Games worked together to host the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam over the first week of November. The Train2Game Blog interviewed Epic’s European Territory Manager Mike Gamble at the Game Jam. You can also read his take on the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam on the Unreal Insider Blog.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on the advice on writing a CV from Epic?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

[Source: Develop Online]

Train2Game & Epic Game Jam student interview: Andrew Small

Train2Game & Epic Games gave Train2Game student teams the opportunity to win one of four places at The Gadget Show Live 2012 and compete for the chance to walk away with a fully licence Unreal Development Kit.  

Train2Game student Andrew Small was one of those Train2Game students taking part. We had a quick chat with him during the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam to see how he was finding it.

Read it here, on Scribd,  or listen via Train2Game radio

Find out more the about Train2Game & Epic Game Jam over at Unreal Insider.

We’re here at the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam on the final day, in the final stretch now, hows it all been going for you?

Yeah, pretty good. It’s been a bit of an up and down ride, we’ve hit so many walls and broke our way through, but we’ve not lost the original concept that we’ve got, and it’s great that we’re slowly getting there together and it’s the first time we’ve got to deal with something like this.

The theme of the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam is Guy Fawkes, what were your thoughts on that when it was announced? And how did you deal with coming up with the game?

Everyone just went silent. We thought ‘What do we do?’ It does give you a lot of creativity, but you’ve just got to think outside box and I think that was the hardest thing, getting past the explosives and getting something innovative out of there.

What’s been the biggest challenge so far? Has it been the lack of sleep or something else?

Oh it’s definitely not the lack of sleep! The biggest challenge is making sure everything stays on track, because you’ve got so many components, everything is working on something different, everybody keeps going and it’s all got to come together at the end. One little problem stops the whole process so it’s just being organised I think.

The winners of the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam get to ‘Make Something Unreal Live’ at The Gadget Show next year, if you won that, what would that mean to you.

It’d just be incredible. In this industry just getting yourself out there and noticed is the biggest bonus you can get, so that would be the dream come true.

Do you think being at the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam has helped you improved your chances of getting into the industry anyway?

Yeah, definitely. For most of us working from home, this is the first chance we’ve got to have a real test of our skills. Getting into that sort of environment, none of us have got any experience of it, so it’s been an amazing thing. You just get the hang of everything, you get used to the flow and you kind of get used to it is just a massive learning curve.

How positive has it been to be part of a team with other Train2Game students?

It’s been the best. We might have been lucky, we’ve got an amazing team, no one is negative about constructive criticism. It’s the biggest bonus, having your own idea and running with it, but you’ve got so many people with ideas, you’ve got to compromise, it brings the whole experience together.

So you’d recommend taking part in a Train2Game game jam to anyone?

Definitely. It was something that I wanted to do but wasn’t sure whether it would be right more me…but yeah, definitely. It’s a perfect example of the stuff you can do. You learn your character flaws, your weaknesses, your strengths, it’s such a development process, it’s brilliant.  

Thanks for your time.

For more information, go to www.train2game.com

Train2Game & Epic Game Jam interview: Train2Game Game Developer James Valaitis

Train2Game & Epic Games gave Train2Game student teams the opportunity to win one of four places at The Gadget Show Live 2012 and compete for the chance to walk away with a fully licence Unreal Development Kit.  

Train2Game Game Development student James Valaitis (Jams JV on the Train2Game forum)was one of those Train2Game students taking part. We had a quick chat with him during the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam to see what they thought about the event.

Read it here on the Train2Game blog, on the Train2Game Scribd site, or listen via Train2Game radio.

We’re about midway through the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, how are you finding it?

Well I’m actually really happy, you’ve caught me at my happiest because I’ve just finished the level I was working on, I’ve now scripted the whole level. We’ve basically broken our whole team up into three micro-teams, and ours has now finished our level and we’re polishing it up now. So I’m really happy with it all.

Are things going well for the team then? Has it all ran smoothly so far?

Yeah, the team is actually brilliant this time. This idea to split us up and group us up according to skill level and where we are with the course has worked really well and I’m really happy with my team.

Of course the prize at the end for the teams that win the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam is the chance to ‘Make Something Unreal Live’ at The Gadget Show. If you got to that stage what would to mean to you?  

I’ve always wanted to develop a game and be known as a really good games programmer. All I want to do is be one of the best and to then have a chance to show I am better than someone else, it’d make me feel amazing, it really would. I’d love it.

So have you been using the skills you already know from the Train2Game course, and have you learned anything new during the Game Jam?

UDK is fairly different to the C++ that I’m learning, but the course has actually helped me to learn the fundamentals of almost all programming languages, because now whenever I see a programming language, I’m thinking “Well, this is how this would work in C++” and I can always just relate it to something I do know, and it just gives me that fundamental knowledge that I can probably do it.

When the theme of the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam was announced, the theme is Guy Fawkes, what did you think about that and how did you go about coming up with an idea for a game?

Well it always seems to be the most random of things, but I guess it wasn’t so random considering we’re around the time of 5th November. I tried more outside the box and like everyone I researched Guy Fawkes and reading about this anonymous man who sent a letter to Lord Monteagle, it really appealed to me so we should base around this anonymous guy. Maybe Guy Fawkes found out that he’d betrayed him and had locked him up in a room, that’s basically what our game is about, it’s about challenge rooms and trying to get out. Almost like Portal but medieval I suppose.

Would you recommend it to others to take part in a Train2Game Game Jam?

No doubt, definitely.

Great, thanks for your time.

Thank you very much.

For more information go to www.train2game.com

Train2Game & Epic Game Jam interview: Train2Game Artist & Animator Amanda Blatch

Train2Game & Epic Games gave Train2Game student teams the opportunity to win one of four places at The Gadget Show Live 2012 and compete for the chance to walk away with a fully licence Unreal Development Kit.  

Train2Game Art & Animation student Amanda Blatch (derelict-technica on the Train2Game forum) was one of those Train2Game students taking part. We had a quick chat with her during the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam to see how she was finding it.

Read it here, on the Train2Game Scribd, or listen via Train2Game radio

Find out more the about Train2Game & Epic Game Jam over at Unreal Insider.

We’re at about the half-way stage of the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, how is it going?

It’s going quite well except for a few system crashes, but we’ve luckily regularly been saving so we haven’t lost too much, so yes, it’s going quite well. We will hopefully get it done in time.

So you’ve learned the importance of constantly backing things up with the system crashes, and was there a bit of a panic when that happened for the first time?

No, because I was going around at the beginning always saying save this, save that and I was getting on everyone’s nerves! So now everyone does it so I don’t bother them anymore.

The big question is have you actually slept yet, and if not, how are you finding it?

I haven’t slept yet, how many hours are we into this actually? I’ve lost track of time.

There’s about 28 hours to go.

I’ve done 36 hours in the past, I reckon I can still keep going because I’ve still got caffeine in my system!

What did you think about the Guy Fawkes theme when it was announced here at the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam?

Should have seen it coming, really should have seen it coming. But luckily our team name fits the theme very well, which is Pryomation.

How did the first team meeting go after the theme was announced? What did you focus on, and was it a challenge to come up with something?

I think we’re all into similar sorts of games so it wasn’t much of an issue. We came up with a concept then about two hours in suddenly ideas changed, then we went back to our original concept seeing as how much we’d already developed it. We learned that keep to the idea we know best rather than doing something new and ruining everything.

There’s a big prize for the winners of the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam as Mike Gamble announced in the opening ceremony, what would it mean to you if your team got to The Gadget Show Live next year?

A few people in my team weren’t aware of this prize and when they heard about it they were shocked for a long time afterwards, it drove them more into wanting to win this game jam. That’s why most of us have stayed up and haven’t slept yet and only two people crashed because they had to sleep.

How have you found the experience of game jamming, do you think it’s actually going to help you develop as an artist?

Yes it is. I’m learning quite a lot of new things from other people here because back at home you don’t have anyone else to talk to. Here you have help all the time and it’s really good and helpful.

It’s been a positive thing then, being able to meet up with 150 other Train2Game students?

I haven’t actually spoken to most of them yet because we’ve been so busy, only my team and a few others I knew from Eurogamer. I think we’re all set into winning this competition with such a huge prize that everyone wants their fame and fortune!

Judging by your experience so far, if you could do another Train2Game Game Jam in future, would you take the opportunity?

Hell yes! It’s really good fun.

Great, thanks for your time.

Thank you.

For more information go to www.train2game.com

Train2Game & Epic Game Jam interview: Epic’s European Territory Manager Mike Gamble

Train2Game & Epic Games gave Train2Game student teams the opportunity to win one of four places at The Gadget Show Live 2012 and compete for the chance to walk away with a fully licence Unreal Development Kit.  

Epic’s European Territory Manager Mike Gamble was one of the game jam judges, and the Train2Game blog managed to grab him for a chat. In this extensive interview, Gamble talks about Epic’s involvement with the Train2Game Game Jam, UDK, the future of the industry and much more.

Read it here, on Train2Game’s Scribd site,  or listen to it via Train2Game Radio. (Part 1, Part 2)

You can also read Mike’s blog about the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam over at Unreal Insider. Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

We’re here at the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, can you tell us a bit about Epics involvement with the event?

We’ve been talking with Train2Game about using UDK in their curriculum, as a quite separate item talking about a game jam at The Gadget Show Live and so a natural point of choosing the teams was to be involved in the game jam here.

Tell us about the prize that’s up for grabs at Make Something Unreal Live at The Gadget Show.

There’s a commercial Unreal iOS license up for grabs for the winning team, which essentially means it’s a source code license rather than binary which will allow the winning team to create a game for commercial distribution.

So why do Epic want to get involved with Train2Game and get UDK in the course?

In a purely non philanthropic manner, the more people that use UDK, the more people who are familiar with our tools, the better they are to go into the industry where our engine is pretty ubiquitous.

Can you tell us a bit about the UDK engine which is available for free to anyone to use?

You can download it from www.UDK.com. It’s completely free, you only have to pay anything when you actually commercialise your output, at which point you’d pay us $99 and then a 25% royalty after you’ve collected $50,000. So basically, if you’ve built yourself a little app, a little game, or whatever really using the technology, on PC, or iOS or Mac, you can put it out there on Steam or the iTunes App Store and make a little bit of cash off it.

So it’s been quite successful for teams doing that then?

Yeah, it’s been very successful, we’ve had some cracking titles, quite surprisingly professional let’s say, and there’s some decent money to be made. But often what we find is a development team will start using UDK, and then by the time they’ve finished the project, they decide to swap over to a commercial UE3 license and we have a path for them to do that and some of them have been incredibly successful.

UDK Train2Game blog image

So what are the benefits for Train2Game students of taking parts in events like this, the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam?

Well I think it gives them a real crash course in UDK, it gives them a crash course in games development, it also gives them a crash course in teamwork among people they don’t know in teams selected for them, which was definitely useful for preparing them for going into the jobs market.  And ultimately the benefit for the winners is they go onto The Gadget Show Live and I think everyone who competes there, whether they win or not, stands a very good chance of getting into the industry in a professional manner.

At the time of recording we’re pre-judging, what will you be looking for in the winning games?

Obviously we’re not looking for finished, polished, Triple A sellable games, that would be ridiculous. We’re really looking at a number of criteria: adherence to the theme we’ve set, completeness of the game insofar as the limits to what they can do in this time. But something that’s small and polished and works is preferable to something that’s huge rambling and buggy. We’re looking for the professionalism of the teams, we’re looking for the quality of the games. There are about 6 or 7 parameters we’re scoring out of a hundred in total.

And for everyone involved it’s good that they have a finished product they can show potential employers?

Exactly! Perhaps the most important thing any student can do for themselves is build a portfolio of work. It’s all very well being qualified, but at the end of the day you have to differentiate yourself from every other qualified person, and if you’ve got a kick arse portfolio that’s really going to help.

A little bit about you now, tell us about your role at Epic.

I manage Europe, for Epic, on the technology and licensing front. That means I promote and sell Unreal Engine 3 licenses to developers big and small.

Earlier this year we saw Unreal’s ‘Samaritan’ tech demo, what was the thinking behind producing that? Does it show the future of the industry?

It shows a future. For us it was…well, we’ve called it our love letter to the hardware manufacturers. It shows what can be done with a level of hardware. It was built using PC Direct X 11 hardware that’s available off the shelf today, and it was us saying ‘Look, if you built this into the next generation of consoles, this is what we could do. Obviously we can’t say ‘You must do this,’, and the hardware manufacturers haven’t hold us what they’re doing, but it was for us to stimulate some thinking about what might be possible.

The Samaritan Train2Game blog image

And it goes against those that keep claiming that ‘PC gaming is dead’ when that tech is available on PC?

Yeah totally, PC gaming is not dead by an incredibly long chalk. You only have to look at the popularity of Steam, it’s different now, it isn’t not boxed products, but there’s a PC game for every single person, in a sense it’s  gone niche. You can get a PC game for a hardcore train guy, you can get a PC game for a hardcore RTS guy, there’s everything there, it’s just not available off the shelf, it’s available digitally.

So the PC is a good avenue for people, Train2Game students for example, to get a game out there.

Yes. On PC, Steam is a fantastic way of getting games out into the market and testing the waters. The iTunes App store is also fantastic. Anywhere where you don’t have to have a license from the hardware manufacturer and there’s a market base built is a great way to get your product out.

And how has iOS changed the industry in the last few years?

I think it has made everybody think twice about what a game is. From a development point of view, it’s meant that again there’s the opportunity for small developers to create some very interesting content and make some good money outside of the traditional publisher model, which is incredibly important for nurturing the growth of the industry.

How do you see that developing?

Tricky one that. You could argue there’s been a gold rush and now it’s very difficult to set yourself apart.  I think these things will evolve, they’re(smartphones and tablet computers) going to get more and more powerful and there will be a point where it’s possible for you to essentially have, for all sense and purposes, have the power of a console on your tablet, plug that into your TV, play it with a remote. It kind of changes what a gaming device is and I think that’ll only continue to accelerate.

How did you get started in the games industry?

Well, in real life I’m a mechanical and production engineer, I worked in the Ministry of Defence for ten years and then I worked in the toy industry. Then in the mid 90s I decided to swap over to the video games industry which was at that point becoming slightly professional, and so I joined as a Producer, basically.

And what advice would you give to those looking to get into the industry?

You have to get qualified. I think the days of being able to wing it are gone. But like I said before, portfolio: it doesn’t matter if you’re a designer, programmer, musician, whatever it is you want to do in games, you need to build a portfolio of the stuff you have done yourself.

And UDK can help that with modding?

Totally, yes! Creating mods is a really, really great way of getting a great portfolio. It’s really hard to build a product from the ground up, but as an individual you can mod, and that’s a really good way of doing it.

Great, thanks for your time. 

Thank you.

For more information go to www.train2game.com

Train2Game & Epic Game Jam on Unreal Insider blog

Train2Game and Epic’s Game Jam was a huge success last weekend, and now Epic Games European Territory Manager Mike Gamble has posted about it on the Unreal Insider blog

Gamble’s post not only gives some great publicity to Train2Game, especially the winning game jam teams, but also offers some insider information about how difficult it was to judge the games made using UDK.

Read about the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam on the Unreal Insider blog here.

The Unreal Insider blog also promises to post future updates about the winning teams as they work their way towards Make Something Unreal Live at The Gadget Show Live next year.

There’s still plenty of reaction to come from the TrainGame & Epic Game Jam, stay tuned to the Train2Game blog and Train2Game Audioboo for plenty of interviews, including one with Mike Gamble himself.

For more information, see the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam official website.

Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game & Epic Game Jam interview: Train2Game Course Director Tony Bickley

 Train2Game & Epic Games gave Train2Game student teams the opportunity to win one of four places at The Gadget Show Live 2012 and compete for the chance to walk away with a fully licence Unreal Development Kit.  

Train2Game course leader Tony Bickley organised the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, and we spoke to him just after the event closed. He tells us how he feels it all went, the meaning of the prize for Train2Game students, and what it meant to have Epic on board.

Read the interview here, on the Train2Game Scribd page, or listen on the Train2Game Audioboo site.

We’re here at the end of the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam, how has it all gone?

Fantastic, a little tiring, but absolutely fantastic. We’ have about 160 people turn up for the Game Jam, the team sizes were 10 teams of 10 and it’s been a pretty good event, I’m very proud of what the students have managed to achieve and even more proud of their dedication and passion driving through.

Tell us what the winners here have won in going onto The Gadget Show Live

We’re putting forward four teams of finalists moving through to The Gadget Show Live. The final prize at The Gadget Show Live is going to be the iOS version of Unreal Engine, as well as personal development plans and tutoring going forward. We believe this’ll put them in very good stead to increase their employability, as well as setting them off to producing their own titles in future.

So it’s a massive opportunity for these Train2Game students?

Absolutely. The most important thing for people trying to get into the industry at the moment is not just proof of understanding but rather proof of ability. With this level of support they’ll be able to work as a solid team on a product, working on one of the best engines in the world. With the tutoring as they go forward, this will really, really enhance their skillsets.

As you say, UDK is one of the best engines in the world, what does it mean for Train2Game to have Epic on board with this?

Fantastic. With the support that Epic have given us in terms of tutorage and support staff, as well as co-sponsoring The Gadget Show with us, it’s absolutely brilliant and has been really, really, appreciated by the students.

How difficult was it to pick out winners from the fantastic games on offer by Train2Game students?

Very tough actually, very, very tough. I’ve been very proud of the students as they’ve come into this, we’re only just moving into using UDK within the teaching materials of Train2Game, so the students, up until a couple of months ago, were not very experienced on it. They’ve had to bring their skill sets up very, very quickly and then on Friday night we assigned the teams for them so there weren’t even pre-formed teams, they’ve had to understand the team dynamics and then work with the UDK engine and they’ve created some fantastic products. The standards were very, very high, we looked for creative input, we looked for graphics, we looked for variations, we looked for innovation, creativity, and it was of a very high standard. 48 hours is not a lot of time and it’s even less time if you want to try and work with an engine of that magnitude. The work that they produced was great.

What next now for the winning teams with the four different genres of games they have to produce?

Apart from going home and sleeping, I will be contacting them with the start of a six month productivity plan for them where they can be milestoned with what they should be looking to learn, and improved the skillsets that they’ve learned here [At the Train2Game & Epic Game Jam] in the last 48 hours, and then starting to prepare them for what they’ll need to do at The Gadget Show Live. It’s going to be 4 days of live development at The Gadget Show, where they finalise a new product using the UDK engine and help present that to the world.

Anything else you’d like to add about this Train2Game & Epic Game Jam?

It’s been a fantastic experience, it’s been very tiring, we’ve all made new friends here, certainly learned a lot and it actually makes me very proud to help train the next generation of computer game developers.

And has it been so successful there will be more Train2Game Game Jams in future?

Absolutely! One of the things one of the students asked me on the way out, even though his eyes were closing, was ‘When is the next game jam?’ Well, give me week to sleep and recover and then we’ll start planning it. We certainly intend to do another one, we certainly intend to make it bigger and better than this one.

Great, thanks for your time

Thanks very much.

For more information go to www.train2game.com