Train2Game News Play Xenoverse 2 FREE

Do you fear jumping into the deep end of the pool? Are you afraid of leaping head-over-heels in love? Is commitment difficult for you?

If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, then there is a solution in the form of DRAGON BALL Xenoverse 2 “Lite”, a free version of the game that will be available for download starting Wednesday, March 20th for PlayStation®4 and Xbox One.

New players entering the Xenoverse 2 through the “Lite” version of the game will be able to experience the following:

  • Play five-story episodes, ‘Raditz’s Attack’, ‘The Saiyan Threat’, ‘Ruckus on Planet Namek’, ‘The Ginyu Force Strikes’ and ‘The Galactic Emperor’, from the main game.
  • Take part in Online Battles and Online Quests – with the option to play against those with the full version of the game (Online events and expert missions will remain exclusive to owners of the full game)
  • Compete in Hero Colosseum mode, with all content and online matches
  • Additionally, players will be able to transfer saved data from the “Lite” version to the full game if they choose to purchase the full version of DRAGON BALL Xenoverse 2

Enjoy saving the universe with Goku and friends!

Train2Game news: Tekken director – Button bashing ‘not a bad thing if it gets people into the series’

Train2Game blog readers may enjoy their games being a challenge to play, but making a title too complex could result in potential players being turned off.

That’s what Tekken director Katsuhiro Harada told Gamasutra about the balancing act of adding complex new features without forcing players to put down the game.

It’s an interesting view on game design that Train2Game students may have to consider when developing their own games.

“What we’ve found is that a lot of players never even touch practice modes,” said Harada, suggesting players tend to avoid tutorials and learn by playing against the computer or friends.

And he points out that when the fighting genre began in the arcades, tutorials were a virtual unknown and that game design was built in a certain way to compensate for this.

“It’s worth noting that when the fighter genre first hit arcades, there weren’t any real tutorials,” said the Tekken director.

“Instead, the designers tweaked the difficulty level such that after a couple of credits, you had already gone from beginner to intermediate player — something you could then improve upon by learning more moves and practicing.”

And Harada suggests that instead of players practicing alone in single player mode, “an online mode where players can just beat on each other without any life gauges, chatting each other while learning the moves,” could be the best way for players to get to grips with fighting games like Tekken.

He also believes that games being simple to pick up is a great way for people to get into a series, using Tekken as an example.

“A lot of other people say that it’s too easy for beginners to enter the game and beat people by mashing buttons! Personally, I don’t see that as such a bad thing if it gets more people into the series, gets them curious about it.”

Harada made the comments in an extensive interview with Gamasutra that Train2Game students, especially those who are fans of the Tekken series, should find interesting.

He also manages to condense the whole Tekken series to just a couple of sentences.

“Basically, there’re these three generations of father and son that don’t get along, and two of them have this Devil Gene, so their dad wants to know what the Devil Gene is, and so they argue with each other about it for a bunch of years. All the other characters just sort of get caught up in it.”

Train2Game students will be aware that needing to condense complicated information can be an important part of any discipline of game development.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on Harada’s comments on game design and tutorials? Is it still important to include them in games? Do you still play tutorials?

Leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

[Source: Gamasutra]

Enslaved fails to reach 500,000 sales

Sales of Ninja Theory’s Enslaved: Odyssey to the West haven’t even reached 500,000. That’s according to the Namco Bandai money report which states the new IP only sold 460,000 copies worldwide.

Namco had predicted sales would reach 800,000.

The disappointing figures suggest that Enslaved becoming a franchise might be unlikely, although only last week the Train2Game blog reported that  Namco Bandai  were looking at a sequel.

“It didn’t perform as well as we hoped it would, but we’re very proud of how it was received by both the media and the gamers who have experienced it,” said Namco Bandai Marketing Director Lee Kirton.

“I can’t discuss where we are in terms of a sequel, but we’re looking at reviews and feedback from the press and because of the gameplay and quality that Enslaved delivered, we see it as a great catalogue title going forward.”

Ninja Theory also want to produce a sequel, but for now are working on the reboot of Devil May Cry for Capcom.

Train2Game tested out Enslaved: Odyssey to the West at last years Eurogamer Expo, you can read our thoughts on the game here.

There’s also a report of the Enslaved Developer Session with Ninja Theory’s Tameem Antoniades a highly interesting read too. It contains information that will be of interest to Game Designers, Game Developers and Game Artists! It’s a must read.

You can also check out the thoughts of Train2Game Blog for more information.

So Train2Game, what are your thoughts on the sales figures of Enslaved? Does it show that producing a new IP is a huge risk? Or was the game just released at a bad time?

As usual, you can leave your comments here on the Train2Game blog or on the Train2Game forum. Alternatively, you can tell us your thoughts via the Train2Game Twitter account.

[Source: Eurogamer]

Train2Game, in association with DR Studios and the University of Bedfordshire, will be holding a Game Jam at the end of March. For more information, see this Train2Game blog post or the Train2Game Game Jam Facebook page. Alternatively, keep an eye on the Train2Game Game Jam Twitter account.

Street Fighter vs Tekken announced. Who will win?

Namco and Capcom are set to make history by each producing a version of the newly announced Street Fighter vs Tekken games.  The two titles, revealed at last weeks Comi-Con, will bring together characters from the developers flagship beat ‘em ups.

Capcom are currently developing the first of these titles, Street Fighter X Tekken.

Utilising the same technology that powered Street Fighter IV & Super Street Fighter IV, TekkenTM characters such as Kazuya Mishima and Nina Williams will make the transition into the Street Fighter universe with suitable redesigns. They’ll retain their unique characteristics and signature moves as they go head to head with the likes of Ryu, Blanka and Chun Li. Paul vs Guile in a battle over the most ridiculous haircut perhaps?

As in Street Fighter IV, game play will feature fully realised 3D character models battling it out in both new and familiar 2D environments. In addition to modes such as Versus and Training that will feature new enhancements , Street Fighter X Tekken will include Tag Team combat where players select two fighters to deliver knockout assist attacks and special combos. How about teaming up Ken and Jin then? Or Heihachi and M. Bison?

The announcement was made by the Producer of Street Fighter X Tekken, Yoshinori Ono, and Tekken series Director, Katsuhiro Harada. Commenting on the origins of the project, Ono said:

“This is history we’re making. Two fighting games that have rivalled each other are finally standing on the same stage. This isn’t just a showdown between Tekken and Street Fighter, but a decisive battle for Capcom and Namco Bandai Games. So I’m going to give it my all.”

Street Fighter X Tekken will be released on both the PlayStation 3 and the Xbox 360. Namco are also working on their own title, Tekken X Street Fighter, which will transfer the Street Fighter characters into the Tekken universe.

So, Train2Game students, how do you feel about the arguably two top developers of beat ‘em ups working together to produce one game? Which title will work better, Street Fighter X Tekken or Tekken X Street Fighter? And which characters would you like to team up?

As usual, leave your comments either here or on the Train2Game forum. Don’t forget, you can also leave your thoughts on the Train2Game Facebook page too.