Train2Game News British women game a month a year


Modern British women spend A MONTH of every year playing video games, according to new research.

Researchers from Guinness World Records 2017 (Gamer’s Edition) have revealed the true extent of women’s growing love of gaming.

The study showed the average female spends up to 12 hours a week glued to either a mobile phone screen (8 hours) or a games console (four hours).

Interestingly more than four in ten female gamers said they find it therapeutic and over a quarter said they get a genuine buzz when they successfully complete a level or score sought after points or rewards.

The typical British female has over five gaming apps downloaded to her mobile device and claims she dedicates 15 percent of everyday to playing games and puzzles.

According to the research of 1,500 women, eight in ten prefer to game own their own but 18 percent regularly play with their other half, with 44 percent saying gaming together has brought them closer in their relationship.

However, there is fierce rivalry between couples with over two thirds (68 percent) of females claiming they are far superior than their partner when it comes to gaming.

Phoenix Perry, Lecturer in Computing at Goldsmiths, University of London said: “As someone who works in computing and video game development, these figures do not come as a surprise to me.

“I regularly work with female gamers who will often describe the therapeutic effect of playing and the buzz of succeeding in a game. And of course, it goes without saying that I very much enjoy the experience myself.

“I am a passionate advocate for women in gaming and the tech industry in general, and my work constantly looks for opportunities to bring people together to raise awareness of our collective interconnectivity.

“Studies like this show that the appeal of gaming is anything but exclusive to men, and that can only be a good thing.”

More than two thirds (67 percent) of the 1,000 girls polled said their favourite type of game was a puzzle or pattern game and the most popular place to play was when in bed (54 percent).

Candy Crush emerged as the top game played by the nation’s girl gamers, followed by Angry Birds and Temple Run.

Just over a third (34 percent) said their go-to place to game was on a bus or train and more than one in ten (11 percent) even get tapping away on their smartphone while in work.

However, 23 percent claim their boss has caught them engrossed in an online game once or twice, but a sneaky 77 percent said they play discreetly so that colleagues think they are working.

Interestingly, 28 percent of the females polled think they are a calmer individual since they started gaming and a quarter reckon they have better reflexes.

Nearly a third (31 percent) felt gaming was the best way to get some ‘me time’.

But more than one in ten (11 percent) female gamers said their kids are constantly nagging them to get off their phone and to stop playing games.

TOP 20 MOST POPULAR GAMES (VOTED BY WOMEN)

1. Candy crush

2. Angry birds

3. Temple run

4. Fruit Ninja

5. Words with friends

6. Cut the rope

7. Subway surfers

8. Flappy Bird

9. Despicable Me: Minion Rush

10.Clash of Clans

11.QuizUp

12.Doodle jump

13.Draw me

14.Crossy Road

15.Lara Croft GO

16.Clash Royale

17.Fifa mobile

18.Fallout shelter

19.Real Racing

20.Kingdom Rush 

Train2Game News Women in creative industries falling

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The number of women in the digital and creative industries are falling.

Just one quarter (26%) of those working in the digital sector are female, new research shows.

The findings, released today by the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES), show the proportion of women is down from 33% in 2002 – far below the UK average of 47%.

The shortfall comes at a time where skilled staff are in high demand: the research found there were a higher proportion of vacancies in digital and creative than across the economy as a whole, with high-level roles such as programmers and web developers remaining unfilled.

The industries now face a battle for talent, as projections suggest that 1.2m people will be needed to fill jobs in the sector by 2022.

Karen Price, Director of the Tech Partnership, a network of employers working on digital skills, said:

“The UK is a world leader in the digital and creative industries. Our software development, visual effects and computer games companies are some of the best there are, and we want to keep them that way. That means that we need to make sure talented people fill the jobs that we’ll need to keep growing.

“The news that female entrants to the digital sector are falling is very disappointing. We want to show women and girls that there are great opportunities in the digital sector, and that the rewards are great too.

“It’s key that we influence girls from a young age  and our TechFuture Girls programme aims to get girls of 10 to 14 engaged with computer skills and IT through after-school clubs. In 2022 these girls will be making choices about further study and careers, and making sure they know how important digital skills are is vital.”

The research suggests such a high volume of vacancies cause more than just increased workloads for employees, with 40% of employers reporting that they had lost business due to not being able to fill posts.

More than 2 million people are employed in digital and creative industries, with the sector worth £137bn to the UK annually.

UKCES research also finds jobs within the sector to be highly productive and well paid, with average earnings up to 25% higher than the UK average.

Digital Economy Minister Ed Vaizey said:

“The UK’s Digital and Creative Industries are amongst our biggest success stories, but for them to continue to flourish we must make sure the next generation of talent is being taught, trained and nurtured. Initiatives like TechFuture Girls that encourage young women to consider a career in this dynamic sector will play an important role in addressing this issue.”