Train2Game News: Games Industry Jobs – 24.01.13

This week’s Train2Game jobs is a special one, Train2Game have teamed up with games industry recruitment agency Aardvark Swift to deliver some top graduate developer position directly to Train2Game students.

For those of you that are unaware of Aardvark Swift, they are the premier recruitment agency in the games industry and also recruit across mobile, digital, toys, nursery and licensing.

Junior/Graduate Gameplay Programmer

North West

£Excellent + Benefits

Our client is one of the UK’s Premier Games Developer. They have a stack of awards and an unrivalled sales track record to back their claims up. Based in the North West, the studio regularly features in the top 10 of the Develop 100 “World’s Most Successful Games Studios” (2007, 2008) and consistently produces AAA titles across all formats. They are seeking a Graduate / Junior Programmer to join the Gameplay team.

Required Skills:

Strong C/C++

Good A levels preferably maths or physics.

A 2:1 degree or above in either computer science or maths/physics degree.

A strong candidate will also have one or more of the following:

  • Experience programming consoles at a low-level on PS3, 360, Wii or PC.
  • Strong 3D math skills.

For more information, please contact Mark Hope at Aardvark Swift on 01709 876877 or Mark@aswift.com

Graduate Programmer

South

£Excellent + Benefits

Our client is a successful UK independent developer. They enjoy excellent relationships with a number of high profile publishers and company growth means they are now looking for Graduate Programmers to join there team

Key skills
• Strong C++
• Object-oriented design
• Good communicator
• Team player
• Passion for games

Desirable skills
• Flexibility (programming teams are generally small so the candidates will likely be asked to work on a variety of different areas during a typical project)

• Extended experience in one or more areas (dependent on seniority – more junior candidates will of course have less experience), in particular:
o Graphics
o AI / Game-play
o Networking
o Tools

In return the company offer an excellent Salary and Benefits.

More details are available by contacting Mark Hope: mark@aswift.com or 01709 834777

Graduate Programmer

Yorkshire

£Excellent + Benefits

Are you looking to join a creative games studio? Then look no further…

My client offers a relaxed and creatively charged atmosphere where talent can flourish. They pride themselves above all on the games they create and their appreciation of the people who create them.

Due to their recent success they are looking to add to their talented team with the addition of a Graduate Programmer.

Responsible For:

  • Writing, debugging and maintaining computer code, often in, but not limited to, C/C++.

– Writing code in a human-readable style, using descriptive and accurate class, function and variable names, and comments where necessary.

  • Carrying out other technical aspects of a project (for example running and maintaining build processes, setting up installers, providing technical information)

– Clearly and accurately communicating progress on, and problems with, your assigned tasks, and the project in general, to your lead programmer and / or producer.

  • Assisting in the production of project milestones and schedules

– Carrying out assigned tasks within the time scheduled for them as agreed with your lead programmer / producer.

  • Ensuring that your work integrates well with the work of other team members, and functions correctly as a part of the whole project.

Standards of Performance:

  • All work should be performed accurately and in a timely fashion

– Producing good quality human readable code as noted above.

  • Being pro-active with regards to problem solving

– Communicating progress accurately

  • Taking an active interest in a project so as to ensure a smooth and error free development process.

– The improvement of the quality of the content required for Team 17 software, including but not limited to iterative play testing, reporting problems and addressing any quality shortfalls as requested.

Key Skills:

  • Having the ability to solve technical problems

– Having an excellent working knowledge of programming language(s), particularly C/C++

  • Have the personal skills and the desire to work as part of a team

Be able to communicate clearly especially when relating to technical issues

How to Apply
For more details please contact Mark at: mark@aswift.com or 01709 834777

Tools Programmer and Graduate Tools Programmer

North West, UK

£Neg + Bonus

Our client has been making games for more than 15 years. They now employ more than 150 people and have released games on major platforms like PS3, Xbox 360, Wii and Nintendo DS. They also work with some Great IP’s and a variety of game types.

They are seeking a Tools Programmer or Graduate Tools Programmer to join their team developing technology at the core of all their productions, from AAA games on every major console and handheld device (over 100 million units sold to date), to their award-winning TV shows, broadcast around the world.

If successful, you will play a significant part in shaping the way art, animation and designs are produced across new projects, as well as keeping our technology up to date with the state of the art in the industry.

They are looking for candidates with:

• A good degree in Computer Science, Maths or Physics or related subject (2.i or above)
• Fluent in C++ and object oriented programming
• Experience of Direct X, OpenGL or similar graphics APIs Experience of writing user interfaces using one or more common UI libraries (Win32 GDI/wxWindows/Qt/…)
• Ability to interact with non-technical disciplines (such as artists and designers), understand their needs, deliver solutions they find intuitive and helpful
• A real desire to make users’ day-to-day work easier, simpler and more productive

A strong candidate will also have one or more of the following:

• Experience of writing plugins for common 3D and 2D packages (Autodesk Maya and Adobe Photoshop preferably)
• A confident grasp of the mathematics involved in CG rendering and animation
• The ability to analyse and optimise algorithms for efficiency
• Experience developing products for one or more non-PC gaming devices

For more information or to apply for the role, please contact Mark Hope at Aardvark Swift on +44 (0) 1709 834777 or e-mail mark@aswift.com

Graduate Gameplay Programmer

Cambridge

£Excellent + Benefits

Our client, the developer of award winning titles, are seeking highly skilled graduate to join their programming team as a Gameplay programmer working on a AAA title for next gen.

They currently have several exciting cutting-edge projects encompassing a range of genres, and are recruiting a mix of programmers for various project team areas such as: networking, 3D graphics, shaders, animation, physics, artificial intelligence, as well as general gameplay programming.

They have a reputation for technological innovation and their programmers get involved in all aspects of system architecture, design and implementation, bringing an extremely high standard of professionalism to the development of all their games, and fully contribute to a dynamic, creative and fun environment, working with advanced technology on the leading games consoles.

The ideal person will have:

Either a good degree, or solid track record, in Computer Science, Maths or Physics.
Possible specialisation in one of the following fields : networking, 3D graphics and shaders, animation, physics, AI.
Industry experience is not essential, but passion and enthusiasm are.
Advanced understanding of C++ and object oriented programming.
Well organized, and capable of code design.
Experience of DirectX Graphics, console toolchains, GUI APIs, LUA scripts, or ASM are also useful.
Familiarity with Xbox 360/Playstation 3 development/Networking/Multi-Threading is a plus.
Good communication.

They have in-house platform abstraction libraries, using a PC development environment to target the major consoles. Game programmers write platform independent game code using our in-house game engine and technology, while engine and tool teams work on company-wide technology and lower level target specific, optimized code.

In return the company offer an excellent Salary and Benefits.

More details are available by contacting Mark Hope at Aardvark Swift via email: mark@aswift.com

Generalist Programmer

London

£Excellent + Benefits

This is the London studio of a successful UK independent developer. They enjoy excellent relationships with a number of high profile publishers and company growth means they are now looking for Programmers who are generalists who are happy programming in a number of areas.

Key skills

• Strong C++
• Object-oriented design
• Good communicator
• Team player
• Passion for games

Desirable skills

• Flexibility (programming teams are generally small so the candidates will likely be asked to work on a variety of different areas during a typical project)

• Extended experience in one or more areas (dependent on seniority – more junior candidates will of course have less experience), in particular:

o Graphics
o AI / Game-play
o Networking

Other details

• Depending on the specific role, experience with middleware such as Unity or Unreal may be beneficial

In return the company offer an excellent Salary and Benefits.

More details are available by contacting Mark Hope at Aardvark Swift via email: mark@aswift.com

Train2Game News: War of the Roses lead programmer talks game mechanics

Get behind the scenes with development of War of the Roses from Fatshark and Paradox Interactive in a talk by lead programmer Robin Hagblom.

Recorded at DreamHack, the world’s largest computer festival which recently took place in Sweden, the thirteen minute long video sees Hagblom discussing the mechanics of War of the Roses and showcasing some new features. It’s all interspersed with videos of the game in various stages of development.

Watch it below here on The Train2Game Blog.

There’s more about War of the Roses here, while be sure to keep reading for the latest news from Paradox Interactive.

There’s also plenty more behind the scenes insight into game development here on The Train2Game Blog.

What are your thoughts on the mechanics behind War of the Roses?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game News: BioWare programmer offers advice on getting into the industry

Those looking to get into the games industry need to be aware that you need more than just a love video games. That’s according BioWare programmer Fernando Secco who argues you need to be aware of a wide variety of different areas.

“I think a good advice is always to say that playing games is very different than working with games. One can love and know a lot about games. But video games are not only about making games, it’s about working in team, building a vision, dealing with customer, studying, learning and finding out that your ideas may be not as good as you thought.” he told the BioWare Blog.

Secco added that whatever area of the games industry you’re aiming for, you need to practice your skills.

“I think the most important thing is make sure that is what you want. Not many people want to mix their hobby with their work. If you are sure what you want then pick an area you like, try to understand what a professional on that area does, which are his responsibilities, what he has to deliver, which tools he needs to know and start practicing.” he said.

Train2Game students can find out more about what it’s like to be a programmer at BioWare in the full interview with Fernando Secco.

There’s much more advice from games professionals on getting into the industry here on The Train2Game Blog.

As usual, leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game News: Reminder – Blitz Games ‘meet the experts’ live stream tonight


Train2Game students can get advice from experienced industry professionals when Blitz Games host a live ‘meet the experts’ web chat at 6:30 p.m. this evening.

“Two of Blitz’s experienced programmers from our BlitzTech and R&D teams will be sharing their knowledge on a variety of topics aimed at aspiring newcomers to the industry as well as experienced coders looking to further their career in a new field or specialism.” reads the announcement on the Blitz website, suggesting that this session will be of particular interest to Train2Game game developers, who’ll be able to watch it here.

Will you be tuning in tonight?

Leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game News: Blitz programmers hosting ‘meet the experts’ web chat next Monday

Train2Game students will be able to get advice from experienced industry professionals when Blitz Games host a live ‘meet the experts’ web chat on Monday 21st May.

“Two of Blitz’s experienced programmers from our BlitzTech and R&D teams will be sharing their knowledge on a variety of topics aimed at aspiring newcomers to the industry as well as experienced coders looking to further their career in a new field or specialism.” reads the announcement on the Blitz website, suggesting that this session will be of particular interest to Train2Game game developers.

The live web chat with the two programmers begins at 6:30p.m. on Monday, with viewers encouraged email, or Tweet questions beforehand.  The Blitz web chat will be available to see here.

Games from the Leamington Spa based developer include Puss In Boots, Michael Phelps: Push The Limit and YooStar 2.

There’s plenty of advice from experienced game developers on getting into the industry, here on The Train2Game Blog.

Will you watch the live web chat from Blitz? What would you ask?

Leave your comments here onThe Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

Train2Game Gadget Show Live interview: Centre for Computing History Curator Jason Fitzpatrick

Train2Game News visited The Centre for Computing History stand at The Gadget Show Live in the Birmingham NEC. While there we spoke with the museum’s trustee and curator Jason Fitzpatrick. In an in-depth interview, he discussed the aims of the centre, the importance of programming, the museum’s upcoming move to Cambridge and more.

Listen via Train2Game Radio, or read the interview below. As usual, leave your comments here on The Train2Game Blog, or on the Train2Game forum.

What is the Centre for Computing History?

It’s a computing history museum, currently based just outside of Cambridge, but we have some sponsorship from companies like ARM and Microsoft Research who have helped support us, and we’re now going to open up in Cambridge in the next couple of months.

What are the main aims of the centre?

It’s the history of computing in general, and we’ve got a bit of a different slant on it because obviously computers are important for that they are, but it’s looking at computers and how they’ve changed us. The term ‘personal computer’ is very much more personal than anyone thought it would be, so having something like computers and the way they interact with our lives and changed the way we are is something that we’ve taken for granted.

So we go on the internet now, shop, and that’s just what you do. But going back to the early 1980s, it wasn’t something you could even dream of doing, so it’s a really short space of time, but things have changed completely, so it’s looking at machines and how they’ve changed things.

And all of the computers are on display here at The Gadget Show Live for people to look at or even use.

Yeah, absolutely! The museum wants to be interactive, so we want to have these things out and people can use these things, play the games as they were, feel how the machines and the keyboards were like. Otherwise, they’re just beige boxes of nothing, but to have one on and see it in use, that means everything.

Now when people play games, they just need to take it out the box or download it first, but back in the 1980s you had to code it yourself. Are those types of machine to see? And is programming something that’s lost on the younger generations?

Yes, certainly. Go back to the 80s and you were typing in magazine games – and most of the time they were wrong anyway – so you’d then spend time trying to work out why they were wrong, and in doing that you were learning programming.  Certainly it’s important, and it’s something we’re very much keen on doing; we take a fleet of BBC Micros out to schools and let kids program them.

For some of those kids it’s quite an eye opener, they don’t even know you can program a computer, which is really strange for me, but that’s the way it is, they’ve just grown up with computers and they’re just ways of accessing the internet or using Word. So, I think programming is a bit of a lost art form, and it’s important that we get it back into schools and into the curriculum, and we’re trying to play our part in doing that.

How do you go about selecting what’s on show in the Centre for Computing History?

It’s really difficult, like choosing your favourite child! Really, it’s about trying to change it from last year, so for this event [Gadget Show Live] we had some other machines on display, so we’ve put those aside this year and do a different selection. For the museum, again, we’re going to keep it fresh, we’re going to make sure that it changes fairly regularly. Because in the 80s there were hundreds of machines, computers and games consoles that came out. You couldn’t have them all on display at the same time, but we can change them around, so that’s what we’re going to do, we’re going to have different displays on at different times.

How difficult is it to maintain the computers? Parts, especially for the older ones, can’t be easy to find.

Yes, it can be difficult sometimes. But we’ve got a lot of support from the general public, it’s really nice, so we get a lot of donations in. And people email us saying “I’ve got an old Commodore 64, but it doesn’t work, do you want it?” But we’ll take it, because it could be used for parts as we have a mountain of old machines that are in various states of working and we basically live off those. So we either try to get those working by fixing them specifically or using the parts to fix others.

How is the museum going to be funded?

There’s a lot of love in it, I must admit. There are a lot of volunteers that do things for the museum like coming out to events and supporting it, fixing the machines, do various things. But it does have a certain amount of funding, from ARM, Redgate Software and Microsoft Research in Cambridge, and they’ve put money into physically moving us into Cambridge.

After that, once we’re there, we’ve got to build the museum ourselves, so we’ll be looking for sponsorship or donations of equipment to physically build the museum. Once we’re there, and we’re opened, then people will pay on the door to come and see us and we’ll just work like any museum, with a shop, cafe, things like that.

But we’re also a little bit different, in that we take a lot of this old technology, and make it available to TV and film companies.  So we then supply this old stuff, or make it do something different, doing documentaries, so that’s another revenue generating things for the museum that keeps it ticking over.  There are a few bits of business we can do to keep things going.

When will the new museum open, and where can people get more information?

Museum version 1 is currently in Haverhill, Suffolk which is going to close its doors for awhile as we move over. Museum version 2 will be in Cambridge and you can go to the website www.computinghistory.org.uk where there’s all the information about the move and when we open. We hope to open in a couple of months. So go on there, follow us on Twitter and Facebook and keep abreast of what we do.

Finally, if there’s one piece of equipment here you could say is the most significant, what would that be?

That’s so hard, because there are lots of significant items in different areas.  For me, in gaming, the Atari 2600; it’s a bit of a personal one because I had one, I was quite lucky. So, that for me is really important because it started the whole cartridge based console system. There were things before it, but it really made cartridges popular. Equally, I think we’ve got things like the ZX80 computer which brought computing down to a price that was affordable, so that’s important. I think I could go round every decade, but those two are my favourites.

Great thanks, for your time.

For more information, go to www.computinghistory.org.uk

Train2Game at EuroGamer with Duncan Ross CTO Genuine Games

Train2Game at EuroGamer with Duncan Ross CTO Genuine Games

Duncan Ross CTO Genuine Games has12 years of industry experience and 9 published titles, as well as having been involved in around 10 others.

Genuine Games Ltd was incorporated in 1998. Working to deliver innovative mass appeal gaming with a passion and desire to entertain, the industry veterans are the most genuine in the business.

There headquarters are based in the scenic Scottish Highlands (Scotland has the highest proportion of game developers per head of population of any country in the world) offering us a wide range of talent.

Train2Game at Eurogamer with Dave Hawes Lead Programmer at Eutechnyx

Train2Game at EuroGamer with Dave Hawes Lead Programmer at Eutechnyx

Dave has worked in the games industry for many years and worked in many different areas on previous and current generation consoles, He currently manage projects, advise on recruitment and architect new parts of the Eutechnyx engine. Hawes spoke at GDC 2008 on intergrating stackless python into a modern multi-platform console engine.
In 2009 Hawes had an article published in game developer magazine on the same topic.

Train2Game at gamescom join Danny Palmer at the press call with Raphel Colantonio President of Arkane Studios talking Dishonored

And find out how Raphel Colantonio got into the games industry