Train2Game News UK Gamers Averaging Over 7 Hours A Week

Video game playing rose to a new level, with UK consumers’ time playing up 4 percent over last year.

The desire to stay connected and entertained while stuck at home during the pandemic has driven online gaming popularity – more than a third of UK gamers (37 percent) have made new friends through online gaming in the last year. In fact, gamers in the UK are now playing video games an average of seven hours 10 minutes each week according to the “State of Online Gaming 2021,” a report commissioned by Limelight Networks, Inc. (Nasdaq: LLNW), on global gaming preferences and habits.

New data shows that the increases in gaming over the last year are driven by gamers’ desire for social connections. Over a third of UK gamers (37 percent) say they’ve made new friends through online games in the past year and 15 percent say the ability to interact with other players is extremely important. Opportunities for interactivity and social engagement are likely drivers for video game adoption with the majority (51 percent) of UK gamers saying they started playing online video games in the past year.

Additional findings from the report include:

  • Performance drives demand for next-generation consoles. Three quarters (74 percent) of global gamers are interested in purchasing a new console, due to updated technology (32 percent) and faster game play (31 percent). Gamers in China are most likely to consider upgrading their console (92 percent).
  • Gamers demand fast gaming experiences. Fast performance is extremely important to 35 percent of UK gamers, the lowest response among all countries surveyed. In addition, 87 percent of UK gamers say the process of downloading games is frustrating.
  • Binge-gaming reached an all-time high. The average global gamer has played video games consecutively for five hours and six minutes, which is a eight percent increase from last year. Sessions in the UK were 4 percent higher than the global average, at five hours and 18 minutes per week. Young gamers ages 18 to 25 have binge-gamed for the longest at an average of nearly six hours.
  • Video games have become a spectator sport. Over half (56 percent) of global gamers say they’ve started to watch others play video games in the past year. The proportion of UK gamers watching others play video games online on a weekly basis reached a tipping point in the past year, increasing from 49 percent to 53 percent.
  • Playing video games is the top entertainment choice for many.  Nearly half of UK gamers (44 percent) say they prefer to play video games versus watching a movie or TV show. 

“Video gaming has evolved into a social platform. Gamers want interactive, high performance, disruption-free experiences that allow them to connect with others and play longer,” said Nigel Burmeister, Vice President at Limelight Networks. “This evolution is putting pressure on gaming companies to match this demand and requires technology investments like edge computing to deliver high-quality gaming environments to users across the globe.”

The “State of Online Gaming 2021” report is based on responses from 4,000 consumers in China, Germany, India, Indonesia, South Korea, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam, ages 18 and older who play video games. This included 500 respondents in the UK. 

Train2Game News Lockdown Gaming Habit

Leading UK games publisher and developer Jagex has today shone a light on the genuine habits of players when it comes to gaming, from preferred play location, to snack choice, to hours spent and more.

Polling just under 2,000 gamers from around the world, the in-depth study disputes – and sometimes embraces – the habits that popular culture has often linked to the gamer stereotype. 

So, how do gamers play? How have lockdowns affected their habits? And how accurate is the basement-dwelling, pizza-eating gamer cliché? 

From the basement to the bedroom 

Contrary to popular belief, it seems that gamers do not confine themselves to basements, with over half of respondents (52.5%) actually playing games in their bedrooms. The living room follows second, with 23% seeking its relaxed confines, whereas 20.5% prefer the more formal set-up of a home office. A mere 3.5% live up to basement expectations.  

Continuing the popularity of the bedroom, overwhelmingly, and across all age groups, gamers wear pyjamas and loungewear for their stints at the keyboard or at the console (43%). In lockdown life though, a surprisingly large amount (30%) are still happy to slip on a T-shirt and jeans. And a liberated 7% freely admit to wearing absolutely nothing while gaming! 

Lockdown life  

When it comes to gaming in our new, indoors-focused reality of the past year, many have sought extra comfort from this hobby, both across the age groups and across the globe. Almost half (49%) say they now game more than they used to, and 15% game during the ‘standard’ working hours of 8am- 4pm. However, only a brave 8% owned up to specifically gaming when they should be working. Around13% have altered the times at which they game but maintained the same amount of gameplay, and 25% haven’t seen their habits change at all due to lockdowns. Just 5% say they now game less. 

Players are also enjoying connecting with friends online while socialising in real life is on hold: A massive 71% of gamers play with other people, be they online friends, friends from “real life” or family members – this certainly suggests that gaming is a more sociable than solitary sport! Overall, people tend to game slightly more with online friends (36%) than real-life friends (28%). 

Sociability is the name of the game when it comes to time of day to play too, with only 7% playing midnight to 4am as gaming night-owls, and just 2% potentially pulling all-nighters (or very early starts) and playing in the 4am – 8am slot. In general, gamers stick to much more sociable hours, with 48.5% playing during the evening slot of 8pm – midnight, and 26.5% playing 4pm- 8pm. 

Phil Mansell CEO of Jagex, said: “Although the past 12 months have been incredibly challenging for everyone across the world, it’s great that gaming has cemented its place as a go-to pastime for more and more people looking to interact and socialise through online games, especially as we cope with the restrictions and lockdowns used to fight the pandemic. This past year has also clearly been important in overturning negative stereotypes about video games that linger in popular culture.”  

Gaming – and other healthy lifestyle choices 

Despite what people might assume when it comes to the food and drink choices of players while gaming, there’s a lot less snacking on fast food and sweets than you might imagine. Perhaps surprisingly, 37% of all players surveyed don’t eat at all while gaming, while the next biggest group (21%) only polish off home-cooked food. Less than half of that amount (10%) consume the next most popular choice – crisps – and fast food such as pizza (9%), and chocolate and sweets (5% each) languish further down in popularity by comparison. At 4%, even fruit beats the possibly more expected choices of chicken nuggets, chips and meat-based snacks (all 3% each). 

The healthiest and unhealthiest age groups may also be a surprise – a whopping 60% of players aged 25- 34 either don’t eat or eat home-cooked meals while playing, compared to just 34% of players aged 35- 44. Players aged 35- 44 are also more likely to consume crisps (16%) and pizza and sweets/candy (12.5% each) than they are a home-cooked meal. 

Most gamers also opt to rehydrate with water (54%) way before anything else, although a cup of tea or coffee is also enjoyed by 14%, with regular sodas/fizzy drinks the favourite choice for 9%. Again, however, older players are likely to shy away from the healthiest choices, with over 45s being powered by coffee (21%) and soft drinks/sodas (21%) before anything else, and 35- 44s even more so, with 31% for coffee and 28% for soft drinks/sodas. 

Music ‘n merch 

When it comes to the type of merchandise gamers choose to buy, preferences are split pretty evenly across the board between figurines, plushies, replica weapons and clothes. Posters and art is the firm overall favourite category at 23%, as well as male players’ favourite to the same degree, but female players are all about the cute soft toys with a solid 40% of female-identifying players picking them as their favourite. Curiously, although 16% of players like to buy game-inspired clothing, only 1% wear said items when gaming. 

With music genres to listen to while playing, electronic was perhaps, unsurprisingly, a popular category for everyone – 19% pick it over anything else, and it registers as the favourite genre for players aged 18 – 24. The next most popular genre is rock (14%), but podcasts come in a strong third with 11%, perhaps showing that gaming and keeping yourself informed aren’t so incompatible.

Train2Game News Free AirConsole Games

AirConsole, a globally leading platform for casual games, today announced that they will provide everyone with free access to all of their video games during the month of November in a new attempt to stop the spreading of the coronavirus.

While Europe and other parts of the world are facing a renewed  increase in coronavirus cases, the Swiss gaming company AirConsole is doing what it can to help the millions of people in quarantine across the globe.

AirConsole is a cloud based video game console that is accessible from every home through the web browser or Android TV. Smartphones are used as gamepads. No additional hardware is required for a full video game console experience. AirConsole boasts a library of 160 games across a variety of genres.

“During the first lockdown AirConsole was able to help millions of people to stay entertained with their families and loved ones. We received overwhelming positive feedback from our community and with people returning to StayHome we understood that it was time for us to act again,” says Rafael Morgan, Head of Product at AirConsole. “Today we’ve decided to give everyone access to the full platform for free for two weeks. We know that a lot of people are affected by lockdowns and quarantines at the moment, and that many will be looking for new forms of entertainment.”

“It’s been a tough time and we would like to help as many people as possible,” says Andrin von Rechenberg, CEO at AirConsole. “After the first lockdown we increased the number of family friendly games on AirConsole. It’s important to us that people without a lot of gaming experience feel welcome as well!”

As in the previous solidarity campaign, players will be able to use the promotional code “919 2020” and get two weeks of full access to AirConsole’s 160 games, which are normally available as part of a subscription called AirConsole Hero.

Get access to the full version of AirConsole:


1. Download the AirConsole App from Apple’s AppStore or Google Play.
2. Launch the app and insert the following code when the numpad appears: “919 2020”
3. The full AirConsole experience will be unlocked for two weeks.
4. Open www.airconsole.com on your desktop browser, connect your smartphone as the gamepad by following the simple instructions and start playing instantly.

The code is valid until November 30th, 2020

Train2Game News Ultimate Lockdown Boredom.Buster

Millie and Molly, a new puzzle game for iOS, Android, Windows, and Mac, promises to help players banish lockdown boredom and stress.

The game stars sisters Millie and Molly, who must defeat malicious monsters from 100 levels across various worlds. Players must use their logic skills to work out which route will allow them to banish the enemies.

There are no timers or lives in the game, meaning that players can solve puzzles at their own pace. If players make a mistake, the rewind and restart functions make it easy to try something else. There are no annoying ads or in-app purchases, either.

“Millie and Molly was designed to be challenging yet relaxing. We wanted players to enjoy all the satisfaction of solving each puzzle without pressure along the way. 

“These factors have made it the perfect lockdown game, because people are looking for ways to have fun, destress, and stimulate their minds,” says Carleton Handley, the Greater Manchester–based indie developer behind Millie and Molly.

The game was released for the Commodore 64 earlier this year and received rave reviews from the community, even gaining a 93% score from Retro Gamer magazine. It’s this feedback that motivated Carleton and artist Saul Cross to bring the game to modern devices, complete with 8-bit and 16-bit graphics and retro-style tunes.

“I received so many messages from Commodore 64 players who said that they’d been playing Millie and Molly with kids, friends, and partners who’d never shown an interest in retro gaming before.

“When Covid-19 took a hit on my freelance workload, it presented the perfect opportunity for me to work on a version for modern devices. One of my proudest achievements is that my wife finished all 100 levels on her iPhone, as she’s never completed a game before!”
Editor’s notes

Game trailer: https://youtu.be/kYjQUnIUd8E